A Student Publication of Lorain County Community College

Community honors fallen officer – LCCC grad

State Highway Patrol Trooper Valez was killed on duty on Sept. 15.

Andrew Krause JRNM 151 “He had one hour left in his shift,” Rey Torres Jr. said. During that hour, on Sept. 15, Torres’ first cousin, Ohio State Highway Patrol Trooper Kenneth Velez, was killed in the line of duty. Velez, who graduated in…

Campus remembers fallen, honors heros on 9/11 anniversary

Traci Kogut| The Collegian
Members of the Lorain County Community College Student Senate hang up thank you notes from students during this year’s Sept. 11 memorial. The notes will be delivered to local police and fire departments on Friday, Sept. 16.

    Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief On Monday, Sept. 12, the Lorain County Community College campus came together to honor and remember those lost during the attacks of September 11, 2001. Members of the LCCC Student Senate accepted thank you notes…

Society of Women Engineers partners with U.S. Army

By Kerri Klatt JRNM-151   Lorain County Community College’s Society of Women Engineers and the United States Army have joined together for three programs starting fall semester to improve army recruitment and retention rates. These programs are provided at no…

First year, first steps

Lorain County Community College's new president, Dr. Marcia Ballinger has high expectations for the institution. 
Photo by Kristin Hohman

  Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief “I was just absolutely thrilled to be named as the sixth president of Lorain County Community College,” said Dr. Marcia Ballinger, the newly minted president of the institution. “I’m just honored that the Board of Trustees…

Dryden selected as interim provost

Tim Krezman Staff Writer Dr. Jonathan Dryden was named the Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic and Learner Services when Dr. Marcia Ballinger was selected as Dr. Roy Church’s successor as Lorain County Community College president. Dryden said there…

Scholarship created in honor of Dr. Roy Church

Alexandra Sauer | The Collegian
Lorain County Community College President Dr. Roy Church at The Legacy of Leadership gala on April 25.

Rebecca Marion Advertising Manager The Lorain County Community College presented the Legacy of Leadership Gala on April 25 to celebrate the retirement and many accomplishments of its president Dr. Roy Church. Not only does the event seek to acknowledge the…

Ballinger named 6th president of LCCC

Dr. Marcia Ballinger
2016

Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief “Community is the middle name of this college, and I think one of the hallmarks of this institution is being responsive to the unique needs of the community. I look forward to doing that,” said Dr. Marcia Ballinger,…

Big Weekend for Commodores Volleyball 

Special to The Collegian

Kirtland, OH- Another solid weekend is in the books for the Lady Commodores of Lorain County Community College as the team traveled to Lakeland Community College for a 4 game tournament. Playing against four Division II teams, LCCC took the first 3 matches before falling to Oakland Saturday afternoon.

In the first match against Mercyhurst NE, LCCC once again dominated the Saints in 3 sets to complete the sweep. Similar to their match back on August 27th, the Lady Commodores made everything difficult for the Saints at the net. Maryssa Kellick had 29 total attacks with 17 kills to lead her team. Along with Kellick, Kara Kelm chipped in 10 kills off of 26 attempts, Shannon Reaser with 32 assist and Ali Stanziano had 12 digs.

After a tough first set and pulling away late by a final score of 25-16, LCCC found their groove dominating the final two sets by a final score of 25-7 and 25-15.

With minimal time to rest, LCCC faced off against a very tough Lansing Stars team that was desperate for a big win Friday evening. The Lady Commodores got all they could ask for as they went four matches winning the sets 25-19, 25-21, 18-25, and 25-16.

The stat lines for both teams were very similar in kills (41 each), 40-37 assist and 69-57 digs in favor of the Stars. The difference was how well LCCC kept their composure late in the sets and allowed Lansing to commit more errors. The Commodores had 10 service aces while only having 6 service errors while Lansing had 4 serving aces to their 8 serving errors.

Leading the way once again was Maryssa Kellick and Kara Kelm who combined for 29 of the teams 41 kills. Big for the Commodores was the amount of digs they had as the team had 57 digs; Ali Stanziano lead the way with 18, Shannon Reaser with 10 and Lindsay Eisbrenner with 10.

After giving up the 3rd set, LCCC took care of business and won the final set 25-16 and won the match in 4.

Much was the same in the team’s 3rd game of the weekend as they took on DII Potomac State who came into this weekend undefeated at 5-0. Coming out very fast, LCCC took set one and was led by Kellick who came away with 24 kills, 7 service aces, and 6 digs. Kelli Warren, who had a quiet two games earlier, had 8 kills while Kelm had 10 of her own.

The Lady Commodores got a better look at the undefeated team in set 2 has things didn’t go as planned; LCCC dropped the 2nd set 26-24 but regathered themselves to dominate the final two sets. Playing every ball like it was game point, LCCC seemed to cover the floor very well as Ali Stanziano had 17 digs and McKenzie Zauner gave her team 14 digs. With this strong play, LCCC found themselves 3-0 on the weekend with one final match left.

In the final game of the weekend, LCCC ran into a very tough team at the wrong time. The Lady Commodores would have no answers for the Raiders of Oakland CC (5-4) who would sweep LCCC. With the first set ending 25-20, LCCC poured the rest of their energy out in set 2 but fell once again 26-24. With the Raiders size and speed, LCCC fell in set three 25-16.

On the bright side, Kellick had a solid game at the net with 14 kills, while Shannon Reaser had 11 digs and Ali Stanziano had 10 of her own. The errors of LCCC doomed them as they just couldn’t put together a clean game against Oakland. With this loss, the Lady Commodores finished the tournament 3-1 and see their season record go to 8-4 (1-1).

LCCC will be back in action Wednesday September 14th at Owens CC. The Express are 10-2 (2-0) and are ranked 6th in Division II in the NJCAA while the Lady Commodores started as the 7th ranked team in Division III. Game is set for 6:00pm.  

 

Welcome week kicks off new school year

Artist Wendy Fredan photographs sixth-year culinary arts major Stephanie Herndon on Aug. 23 during Welcome Week on the campus of Lorain County Community College. Fedan has been drawing caricatures for over 20 years.

Artist Wendy Fredan photographs sixth-year culinary arts major Stephanie Herndon on Aug. 23 during Welcome Week on the campus of Lorain County Community College. Fedan has been drawing caricatures for over 20 years.  Photo by Traci Kogut

 

Early College High School students Ashley Metcalf and Kachina Lester stair their race through the obstacle course. Photo by Kristin Hohman

Early College High School students Ashley Metcalf and Kachina Lester stair their race through the obstacle course.
Photo by Kristin Hohman

LCCC President Dr. Marcia Ballinger kicks up her heels with Kionna McIntosh-Pharns and students during the All-College picnic.

LCCC President Dr. Marcia Ballinger kicks up her heels with Kionna McIntosh-Pharns and students during the All-College picnic. Photo by Traci Kogut

Jessica Justice, wraps her arms around her daughter Atheena as her daughter Paige has her caricature drawn.

Jessica Justice, wraps her arms around her daughter Atheena as her daughter Paige has her caricature drawn. Photo by Traci Kogut

 

Kionna McIntos-Pharns, staff assistant to the vice president, leads a group of students in a dance during the All-College picnic on Aug. 26.

Kionna McIntos-Pharns, staff assistant to the vice president, leads a group of students in a dance during the All-College picnic on Aug. 26. Photo by Traci Kogut

Basketball teams seek ‘academically sound’ players

Mark Perez-Krywany

Staff Writer

 

Those who love to play basketball on the cement will have a chance to play on the hardwood. Marty Eggleston, head coach of the LCCC men’s college basketball team, will be holding open gym sessions on Mondays,

The 2015-2016 LCCC men's basketball team. Submitted photo

The 2015-2016 LCCC men’s basketball team. Submitted photo

Wednesdays, and Fridays at 5:00 pm in the Field House in the Ewing Center (EC), but act fast if you want to be apart of the team, According to Coach Eggleston, there are only three to four spots left on 16-man roster. “My recommendations are that if anyone expects to make the team, you would come to these open sessions,” Coach Eggleston said.

The team will consist of about 12 true freshman, who are players coming straight out of high school. This means that the Commodore squad will be a young team.

Coach Eggleston’s biggest goal is not only to win basketball games, but to make his players better students and men. “They must be academically sound,” Eggleston said. “We travel a lot and there’s a lot of practice time, so they need to manage themselves in the classroom.”

The National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) requires that athletes must be a full time student with a minimum of 12 credit hours. Players must also have at least a 2.85 gpa to be eligible according to the eligibility pamphlet on the NJCAA’s website.

Eggleston takes academics seriously. The desktop picture on his laptop shows him with former players wearing the cap and gown that can only be found on graduation day.

A cartoon called “Sports without education” hangs in Eggleston’s office, showing a person holding a basketball with a basketball hoop in the distance. The hoop has a money sign on the backboard with text calling it ‘the long shot’. The caption says “educate yourself”, meaning education is essential to success in sports.

Any players who are interested, or have more questions can contact Coach Eggleston at (440)-365-5222 ext. 8310 or email him at basketballcoach@lorainccc.edu.

The 2015-2016 LCCC women's basketball team. Submitted photo

The 2015-2016 LCCC women’s basketball team.
Submitted photo

Any women who want to play for the women’s team can go to EC on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:00 pm to 4:00pm. Head coach, Dr. Vince Granito can be contacted by emailing vgranito@lorainccc.edu, or by visiting his office at room 211J in the iLoft on Mondays and Thursdays between 8:30 am and 6:30 pm.

First year, first steps

 

Kristin Hohman

Editor-in-Chief

Lorain County Community College's new president, Dr. Marcia Ballinger has high expectations for the institution. Photo by Kristin Hohman

Lorain County Community College’s new president, Dr. Marcia Ballinger has high expectations for the institution.
Photo by Kristin Hohman

“I was just absolutely thrilled to be named as the sixth president of Lorain County Community College,” said Dr. Marcia Ballinger, the newly minted president of the institution. “I’m just honored that the Board of Trustees of the college have put their faith in my leadership and moving our college forward.”

In April, Ballinger was selected to follow Dr. Roy Church, who retired from the post after nearly 30 years, and has been on the job since July 1. The college’s Board of Trustees voted unanimously for Church’s successor.

Although in her new role for only a few short months, Ballinger has taken strides to implement her own policies and philosophies.

“First and foremost, driving student completion and academic success,” Ballinger said of her goals and expectations for her first year as president. “That has really been an area that we have been focused very deeply on to ensure that we have the right programs and delivery and wrap-around systems and services so that every student is successful here.”

One of Ballinger’s own personal philosophies plays into this goal of student success. “Every student’s dream matters, and I firmly believe that it is about how Lorain County Community College can be student-ready.”

Ballinger believes that too often colleges ask if their students are prepared for college, but she has taken a different approach due to LCCC’s diverse enrollment. “We’ve tended to think about how students are college-ready,” Ballinger said. “We serve everyone, whether that’s someone who is directly out of high school, in high school, an adult who has come back for additional education or who is coming to college for the first time. We serve so many different populations,” she stated. “I firmly believe it’s about how can we, as your community college, really provide the greatest resources and understanding of what student needs are today.”

Ballinger said one of her other goals is to impact the local economy so the community can be successful. “The programs that we have, the work that we do in the economic development space, is really creating that environment so that students, graduates can thrive in this community and have very meaningful employment and that it contributes to the overall growth of the community,” Ballinger said. “We’re a catalyst for that.”

Ballinger also believes that the college needs to be an active participant in the community.

“You can’t help lead a community that you don’t know, and you can’t love a community that you don’t know,” Ballinger said. “Really being a part of helping to drive the direction and immersing myself in the community is huge.”

According to Dr. Ballinger, community colleges have an important role in higher education, and the presidents of those community colleges have a unique leadership opportunity.

“Community colleges today, I think, are the driving forces of higher education and the economy,” Ballinger said. “Being in the leadership role for this most innovative catalyst for economies and communities is probably one of the most unique opportunities for leadership in America today. We’re at a very pivotal moment,” Ballinger continued, “in that higher education is transforming. When community colleges were created 50-plus years ago, the purpose is still the same, serving the unique needs of that local community. But that catalytic role of really driving change, innovation, being flexible, agile, and helping to create that qualified workforce for the key driving industries of the community, can’t be overstated,” she explained. “We’re in a very unique position.”

Dr. Ballinger is at the beginning of her 26th year on campus, having started in marketing and media relations in 1991. Since then, Ballinger has served as vice president for strategic and institutional development from 2002-2011, and most recently, as provost and vice president of academic and learner services from 2011.

As the sixth president of the college, Ballinger is the first woman to serve.

“As a female [I understand]what it’s like to be that working mom who went back to school,” Ballinger commented.

Ballinger is motivated by the tough socioeconomic circumstances for single mothers, and hopes the college can move them out of those situations and out of the lower echelons of the community.

“To be in this role as the first female president and to help motivate and encourage others to achieve all that they believe is possible – I want to bring that to life for everyone,” she said.

“A hallmark of this college has always been one of innovation, has always been one of community,” Ballinger said. “I think we will continue to be, not only at the forefront of helping shape higher education, but to be a model of what’s going to advance our community and region. And that’s what we’ve always been about,” Ballinger continued. “I hope that my leadership creates the next generation of leaders. Our students are our leaders, current leaders and future leaders. The empowered and thriving community is what this college is about, and I want to see that perpetuated into the future.”

 

Students split on election opinions

Hillary Clinton Democratic Party

Hillary Clinton
Democratic Party

Donald Trump Republican Party

Donald Trump
Republican Party

JRNM 151 students

While Presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are out on the campaign trail working to secure their voting base, a different campaign is being waged a bit closer to home. Ohio is a battleground state, and the most important one for Trump because no Republican nominees had been elected to the White House without winning the state.

Out of 32 students interviewed on Aug. 24 on campus, 12 students would not participate in this election. Ten students said they would vote for Trump whereas nine said they would vote for his challenger Hillary. One student hopes to vote for a third party candidate.

If Lorain County Community College students’ reaction is an indication, both Trump and Hillary are not Ohio’s favorite candidates. Many people are struggling with their choice of candidates.

The vanishing voters

Stephanie Feurst, a junior Middle Childhood Education major at Lorain County Community College, has no plans to vote for either Clinton, orTrump. I don’t care enough about politics or either of the candidates to vote this year,” Feurst said. “Neither of them are good choices for the presidency and I don’t want to vote for either of them.”

Sam Bednar voted for John Kasich in the Republican primaries. “I liked his policies while he was governor,” said Bednar, a computer information systems major. “I just felt right about him.” However, Bednar is not enthusiastic about Trump and Clinton.

Psychology major Benjamin Colon is another student disenchanted with both candidates. He said this election campaign has failed to show us a democratic process that works. He is also upset about the mishandling of classified information by Clinton and that she has failed to prove herself. “We have too many clowns already in government,” Colon cited as his reason not to vote for Trump either. Colon believes that we need someone who not only speaks about change, but someone who is actively making those changes.

Accounting major Christina Wilson won’t participate in the election either.” Both candidates are more interested in money and title than the presidential issues at hand,” she said.

Trusting in Trump

Law Enforcement major Jonathan Rovere isn’t pleased with either candidate, but he has made his decision. “I’m voting for Trump,” he said. “He’s the lesser of two evils, but overall I feel this is a bad election year.” Mark Goldauskas, a computer science major, feels exactly the same way. “Trump is the lesser of two evils,” he said.

Tiffany Skrzypek, a business forensics investigation major, favors Trump. “He seems real. All of his joking aside, I feel that he genuinely wants to help people.” Tiffany gives the recent example of Trump visiting the flood-damaged parts of Louisiana to support this belief. “I believe he is a smart businessman,” Skrypek said. “It doesn’t matter if something has failed with him or the business he has had. I think people don’t like Trump because he is different and tells it how it is,” she continued. “He is very outspoken and what he says isn’t scripted role of how someone should act and I love that.”

Sophomore Joshua Hass will be voting in his first presidential election and will be supporting Trump. He is disillusioned with the way politicians have been conducting business in Washington, D.C., and sees Trump as an alternative. While some view Trump’s comments as brazen or crass, Hass views Trump’s unapologetic comments with admiration “Not everyone will agree with every candidate, but I can appreciate and respect Trump’s lack of political correctness in a world where everyone is easily offended,” Hass said. “He speaks his mind and is not afraid to say anything, and that is something I think is really strong in a candidate.” 

Cheering for Clinton

“Trump is just going to get our country into lots of trouble,”said journalism major, Aaron Liles. Hailey Blankenship, who is majoring in physical therapy, echoed similar views. “I don’t like how Trump establishes his viewpoints,” she said.

Student Uriah Jackson said that he would be voting for Clinton on Nov. 8 because she has the most qualifying experiences out of all the candidates and he supports Hillary’s ideas and where she wants to take this country.  Jackson, who is majoring in social work, is intrigued by the fact that we have not yet had a presidential candidate who has been married to another former president before. Jackson added that Trump would not lead this country in the right direction and that would be very bad for us. In the beginning of this election process, Jackson said that he was worried about where things were heading, but now he feels confident now that the dust has settled and the major candidates have emerged.

“I’d go with Hillary, but I don’t like either of them,” said business major, James Bellamy.

Freshman Ariana Vargas agreed. “They both suck but I’m probably voting Hillary. She at least knows something about the White House. She supposedly lied yes, but you’re telling me everything Trump has done has been truthful and honest?” Vargas added. “I think Hillary is the better of the two evils and she might actually be able to do some good as president.”

Health science major Emilee Ratti voiced her support for Clinton. “[She is] the lesser of two evils [compared to Trump].”

Radiology student Gabby Senegal supports Democrats just as her parents have advised her to. “I don’t like Hillary, but I really don’t like Trump, so I am voting democratic,” she said.

Jill Stein Green Party

Jill Stein
Green Party

Gary Johnson Libertarian Party

Gary Johnson
Libertarian Party

 

 

 

Candidates differ on education

Logan Mencke

Staff Writer

With the presidential election going into its final months, we have heard just about everything from the presidential nominees.  Well, everything except for what should be done regarding the issue of education.  Because there have been numerous hot-button problems that have captured the media’s attention, education has taken a backseat in the political agenda of the presidential nominees.

Although it is not at the forefront of issues that need to be resolved, that doesn’t make it any less important.  Student debt has surpassed $1 trillion with the average college student raking in around $35,000 in debt according to time.com.  The impact caused by this alarming amount of debt could have dire consequences for our economy.  Another obstacle with education in the United States is the poor performance of students compared with the rest of the world; the U.S. ranks 17th in educational performance.  If the United States plans to stay competitive with the rest of the developed world, these problems need to be addressed.

Hillary Clinton’s educational agenda aims to help alleviate college students’ debt by offering a three-month suspension of loan payments to borrowers of federal loans.  Throughout this three-month period, the Department of Education will offer assistance to borrowers with consolidating their loans and reducing the amount of monthly loan payments.  For future college students who come from a family that makes less than $85,000 a year, they will be able to attend an in-state public college or university without paying tuition, according to hillaryclinton.com.  With an idea adopted by Bernie Sanders, Clinton plans to make all community colleges tuition free.  This will be all paid for in full by limiting certain tax expenditures for high-income taxpayers.

In contrast with Clinton’s plan, Donald Trump calls for the federal government to take a hands-off approach to education.  Believing that state governments should handle education policy locally, Trump would heavily cut funding to the Department of Education.  Additionally, he wants to eliminate Common Core from schools.  To improve educational performance, there should competition among different schools brought on by charter schools and vouchers.

The libertarian candidate Gary Johnson echoes Donald Trump’s plan of removing the federal government involvement in education policy.  However, Johnson would push to abolish the Department of Education entirely.  Vouchers and school choice is also supported in his policy.  Jill Stein, the Green Party candidate, wants a tax-free bail out to everyone with student debt much like how the government bailed out the banks during the Great Recession.

 

Student Voices:

“Make education more affordable.” Rachel Miller, social work

“The cost in general. Not just the tuition, but textbooks as well. When you pay $300 for a textbook, it’s pretty ridiculous.” Scott Wilhems, networking

“I don’t think college should be free. Nobody will take it seriously if it’s free. Paying for it makes you work for it.” Justin Harinarine, business management

“Cheaper tuition.” Ryan Bennett, associative science

 

 

 

 

Dryden selected as interim provost

Tim Krezman

Staff Writer

Dr. Jonathan Dryden was selected as the interim provost and vice president of academic and learner services.

Dr. Jonathan Dryden was named the Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic and Learner Services when Dr. Marcia Ballinger was selected as Dr. Roy Church’s successor as Lorain County Community College president. Dryden said there are many initiatives that he and the college are working on to help students that play into LCCC’s ‘Vision 2020’, a strategic outline of the college’s mission.

One of those initiatives is called Guided Pathways. “This program is about helping students identify career and academic goals,” Dryden said. “If students are interested in an area but are not sure specifically what they want to do, this will help them figure that out.”

For example, if a student knows they might want to pursue something in business, they will be assigned to an advisor who specializes in those programs and they can help the student decide which specific program to pursue.

“We need to do a better job helping students complete their programs more efficiently,” Dryden said. “Even though graduation rates have risen at LCCC, there is still more that can be done to ensure students are able to complete their programs and not get discouraged by taking classes that they do not need.”

Another initiative is a redesign of the advising process. “The goal of this is for every student to be assigned to one advisor, even if they don’t meet with them every time they need to see an advisor,” Dryden said. “That way they know who they can talk to about their program and the advisor can help them finish in the most efficient way.”

The final plan Dryden mentioned is called Math Pathways. “We just want to make sure students only take the math classes they need because so many get held up on their math requirements,” Dryden stated. He hopes this will also help improve graduation rates.

Dryden said that LCCC will be looking for a permanent provost in the near future. Even though there is no timeline for that, he said he would be interested in the position because he loves helping students at this level.

Campus construction leads to innovation

Andrew Krause

JRMN 151 

As many students know, the Nord Advanced Technology (AT) building has seen an addition to its existing structure growing since February. A trip down Enterprise Drive, along the western face of the campus of Lorain County Community College leads past the fences, workers, and heavy equipment steadily putting in the work that will mark the next phase of specialized innovation and growth. This new addition will further the goal of LCCC providing support and workforce development to the manufacturing and technology sectors of the greater Lorain County region.

Construction crews continue work on the Nord Advanced Technology (AT) building. The project is set to be completed in the spring of 2017 at a cost of just under $3.3 million.

Construction crews continue work on the Nord Advanced Technology (AT) building. The project is set to be completed in the spring of 2017 at a cost of just under $3.3 million. Photo by Traci Kogut

According to Laura Carissimi, Purchasing/Facility Planning director at LCCC, the new campus addition will link the AT building to the Patsie C. Campana, Sr. Engineering and Development Center (PC), with both buildings receiving renovations. The new facility will nearly double the current size of the fabrication laboratory and allow for additional upgrades and expansion to the campus’ Computer-Integrated Manufacturing laboratory as well. The new addition will feature upgraded infrastructure, such as better ventilation and exhaust needed for more in-depth fabrication processes.

Carissimi anticipated the next several months will see the end of the new facilities’ construction, potentially by the end of this calendar year. “We can start installing A/V and moving in equipment from there,” Carissimi said. She expressed hopes to have some components of the new addition available for use during the spring term, with additional components being phased in accordingly from there.

The Nord Advanced Technology and Pastie Campana buildings are under construction to create more space and improved facilities.

The Nord Advanced Technology and Pastie Campana buildings are under construction to create more space and improved facilities. Photo by Michael Flanigan

“The construction bid was awarded to Coastal Quality Construction for $3,297,500”, said Carissimi. “$2.4 million from a state grant,” she explained. These funds will be used to help fund the project. The LCCC Foundation has also contributed $750,000 to help purchase new equipment.

Coastal Quality Construction, Inc., is headquartered in Broadview Heights, Ohio. The company has also handled major construction jobs such as building distribution centers for Door-to-Door Organics in Plymouth, Michigan and Mason Run High School in Columbus, Ohio. The design of the facility was completed by architecture firm WMF of Erie, Pennsylvania, who have just recently won the bid to design a new LGBT community center in Cleveland, Ohio.

 

LCCC grads look forward to the next step

 

Retiring LCCC president, Dr. Roy Church during his speech to the class of 2016.

Retiring LCCC president, Dr. Roy Church during his speech to the class of 2016.

 

Kristin Hohman

Editor-in-Chief

“I’m not going to trip. I’m excited, and it’s over,” were the thoughts of Olivia Moe as she crossed the stage to receive her diploma. Moe, along with 1,759 other graduates, collected their degrees and certificates during Lorain County Community College’s 52nd annual commencement ceremony on May 14, 2016.

The ceremony began with a welcome from retiring LCCC president, Dr. Roy Church, who had a unique invitation for the graduating students before him.

“Before we get too far in today’s celebration,” Church said, “I know there is something we all want to do. I know most of us have a phone with us and we’re all excited to mark this day with the indisputable proof that we were all here – the selfie,” he said, as he encouraged students to pull out their cell phones and snap a quick picture to share on social media.

“Earlier this morning, I snapped a selfie with the district board of trustees and the other platform guests. I mean, this is my last chance – I had to capture this moment,” Church stated as his selfie appeared on the projection screens on either side of the stage.

The theme of this year’s ceremony was ‘leadership’, a theme that weaved its way through Church’s opening remarks.

“All of the graduates here today have shown dedication and persistence by getting to this point and earning a degree. In your hard work, you’ve given others someone to look up to and proven to yourself that you can set a goal and achieve it,” Church remarked. “Whether you realize it or not, you are all leaders here today, lighting a path to a brighter future.”

“I think it’ll be different. Being older and wiser – it’ll be better,” said graduate Ta’nija Drummer, when she thinks of the possibility of attending Cleveland State University this fall. Drummer, who earned both her associate’s of arts and associate’s of science, said that LCCC played a big role in preparing her for her future, mainly through the Early College High School program.

Dr. Marcia Ballinger, LCCC’s current provost and vice president for academic and learner services and incumbent president, was the event’s keynote speaker.

“16 years ago today, I sat where you are sitting today,” said Ballinger, who received her master’s degree in business administration from the University Partnership program.

“Somehow I managed to multitask and prioritize – just like all of you here today. You have overcome countless barriers to reach this milestone moment in your life and I, for one, could not be more proud,” she told the graduates.

Ballinger concluded with words of encouragement for the class of 2016. “Whatever your dream is, it is not too late to achieve it,” she said. “Never tell yourself you’re too old to make it. Never tell yourself you missed your chance. Never tell yourself that you aren’t good enough. There is still time left. You can do it, whatever

LCCC grads (left to right): Barbara Haase, Kelly Long, Mindea Wharton, and Terri LaGurdia pose for photos during a reception held after the ceremony.

LCCC grads (left to right): Barbara Haase, Kelly Long, Mindea Wharton, and Terri LaGurdia pose for photos during a reception held after the ceremony.

it is,” Ballinger commented.

Included in this year’s class were 1,460 LCCC graduates, 300 University Partnership graduates, and 64 Early College High School graduates.

“I’ve grown so much,” said Moe, who will be attending Cleveland State University this fall to study film and television production. “I’m looking forward to the next step.”

 

Collegian receives seven Press Club awards

Kristin Hohman

Editor-in-Chief

Delaney-Gesing

Delaney-Gesing

Lorain County Community College’s student-run newspaper, The Collegian, received seven accolades in the 2016 Excellence in Journalism Awards. The awards will be presented by the Press

Reynolds

Reynolds

Club of Cleveland at a banquet on June 3 at the House of Blues in Cleveland.

Winning staff members include Alex Delaney-Gesing, Cody Grossman, Kristin Hohman, Olivia Moe, Keith A. Reynolds, and Charlotte Weiss.

Delaney-Gesing won the award for Best Print Feature Story for a trade/2-year school for her story “A victim of violence”. The story chronicled the abuse that LCCC student Jennifer Varney suffered at the hands of her boyfriend and the issue of domestic violence across the country.

“Cross country takes 9th at nationals”, written by Grossman and Moe, won Best Print Sports Story for a trade/2-year school. The article details the NJCAA DIII National Championship match, in which

Moe

Moe

LCCC’s cross country team placed ninth out of 20 teams.

Reynolds, Hohman, Moe, and Weiss all won the honor for Best Online Report for a trade/2-year school for their work on “LCCC president retires”. The article announced Dr. Roy Church’s retirement from LCCC after nearly 30 years at the institution. “Dr. Church retires”, also written by Reynolds, Hohman, Moe, and Weiss, received the award for Best Print Newspaper Story for a trade 2-year

Weiss

Weiss

school.

“Students struggle with obesity”, written by Weiss, received two honors, one for Best Online Report, and the second for Best Print Feature Story. The story follows LCCC graduate and adjunct faculty, Norene Bohannon, as she struggles with obesity and shared her weight-loss success.

Hohman

Hohman

The entire Collegian staff also won for Best Print Feature story for “Thanksgiving memories”, where each member of the staff wrote about his or her favorite holiday memory.

Each spring, the Press Club of Cleveland acknowledges the best in print, online, and broadcast journalism. Journalists across the country judge the hundreds of entries that are submitted. The awards ceremony will be held on June 3 at the Cleveland House of Blues.