Traci Kogut| The Collegian Members of the Lorain County Community College Student Senate hang up thank you notes from students during this year’s Sept. 11 memorial. The notes will be delivered to local police and fire departments on Friday, Sept. 16.

Traci Kogut| The Collegian
Members of the Lorain County Community College Student Senate hang up thank you notes from students during this year’s Sept. 11 memorial. The notes will be delivered to local police and fire departments on Friday, Sept. 16.

Kristin Hohman

Editor-in-Chief

On Monday, Sept. 12, the Lorain County Community College campus came together to honor and remember those lost during the attacks of September 11, 2001. Members of the LCCC Student Senate accepted thank you notes from students, faculty, and staff to be displayed in the College Center building. The notes will be delivered to local fire departments and police stations to honor those who serve our community.

“We are going with a trend that’s been happening over the past couple years that been getting away from more a memorial heading more towards the service aspect of 9/11,” said student senator, Brendan Bennett. “We are encouraging students to look at different opportunities in the community and also within the college to volunteer.”

“My step father just passed away last week and he was a firefighter who was in service when 9/11 happened,” said fitness management major, Andrew Smith. “He was a part of the precinct who went over to lend support to (New York) and he really changed my view on how I thought of the country as a whole,” he said. “What I wrote on the card was ‘Thank you Albert for being a real dad and a real hero’. He never liked the word hero. He wouldn’t let us call him that, but he was a firefighter for 25 years, what do you think you are?” Smith asked.

“I wrote thank you to all the firefighters and police officers,” said Alexandria Cheek, an early childhood development major. “I know a lot of people died in it so I know that they helped out a lot. I definitely appreciate it.”

“I think it’s really important because this is the generation that 9/11 happened while we were all alive,” said student senator Jaden Cataldo. “Our generation as college students can tell you where we were and what we were doing. So it’s still a common ground for everyone to talk about.”

The thank you notes will be hand-delivered to local first responders on Friday, Sept. 16.

Rebecca Marion contributed to this story.