During the week of April 4, Lorain County Community College was host to the three finalists in the search to succeed Dr. Roy Church as the college’s president. Dr. MaryAnn Janosik, Ray Michael Di Pasquale, and LCCC’s current provost and vice president for academic and learner services, Dr. Marcia Ballinger, visited with students, faculty and staff, and members of the community as they vie for the vacancy following Dr. Church’s retirement this summer after nearly 30 years as president of the institution. Each candidate took a tour of the campus, and held town-hall-like meetings, giving each demographic the opportunity share their hopes about LCCC’s future.

Olivia Moe

Managing Editor

Kristin Hohman & Rebecca Marion contributed to this article.

Dr. MaryAnn Janosik speaks to students on April 5.

Dr. MaryAnn Janosik speaks to students on April 5.


On April 5, Dr. MaryAnn Janosik, the current head of school for Stanford Online High School in Palo Alto, California, spent time interacting with current LCCC students. During this session, students seemed to feel that the college is run more like a business and asked Janosik how she would handle that situation. Janosik firmly stated that she believes that education should come first and foremost in the college environment.

“What we need to do in Lorain County is build on what has already been done,” Janosik said during her meeting with community members the afternoon of April 5.

She has a great deal of respect for Dr. Church and his accomplishments at LCCC, she stated, adding she has no intentions undoing all of his work. Janosik also respects the work that Dr. Roy Church has already achieved at LCCC. “I do not want to reinvent the wheel, so to speak, on what he has already accomplished here at LCCC. I want to take it to the next level,” Janosik said.

A native of Lorain County and a graduate of Lorain County Community College’s class of 1976, Janosik hopes to return to the school that started her on her career path.

“I feel in sync with LCCC,” she said.“I am proud of mypath and the direction LCCC has put me on, and I want to continue forward.”

Janosik is not contending for the opening at LCCC simple because there is such an opening, she said. “This is home for me,” Janosik said. “I am not shopping for another job because I am, at this time, at the point where I want to be. I want to come here and stay.”

“I feel in sync with LCCC,” she said.“I am proud of my path and the direction LCCC has put me on, and I want to continue forward.”

Dr. MaryAnn Janosik

Exploring the relationship between the college and its external resources; putting an emphasis on community outreach; and incorporating shared communication between the campus administration, students, and community are just a few of Janosik’s goals if given the presidency at LCCC. “I like to be visible and get to know the community and the community members,” she said. “I [currently] spend all of my time in my office. I want to be out in the community and have conversations with members of the community. As dean I should participate,” Janosik said. She added that she wants to have a strong relationship between the school and Lorain County’s business community. She hopes to do so and keep the culture of the college at the same time.

Janosik’s top academic priorities would be to increase degree completion, especially with programs that often have wait-lists; assist in finding sources to support students who are affected by the social, emotional, and mental aspects of college and to help their emotional and mental health; increase enrollment; and reassess the financial means of students.

“I will be available and listen to people,” Janosik said. “If I am going to have a conversation with you, I am going to listen. Change is hard at anytime, no matter how small it is,” she continued. “Some react emotionally different than others. I think with good communication as a focus point, we will be starting at a good point for the future to come. People need to feel safe and comfortable,” she said.

Janosik has also worked extensively with anti-bullying campaigns, especially with those in the LGBTQ community in Indiana, and hopes to begin a similar setting for students at LCCC. However, Janosik does not want extreme seclusion, but instead encourages differences “There needs to be a dialogue between students of different ‘groups, it helps build a stronger community and stronger relationships between citizens,” Janosik added.

“I have a 96% accuracy on my Oscar ballot, my goal someday is to get to 100%,” Janosik, an avid film buff, joked.

                                                                                                                                                          

Kristin Hohman

Editor-in-Chief

rmd

Ray Michael Di Pasquale speaks to students on April 7.

Ray Michael Di Pasquale visited the campus of Lorain County Community College on April 7, participating in meetings with students, faculty, and residents of Lorain County.

Di Pasquale recently retired as president from the Community College of Rhode Island, where he served as the college’s president for roughly nine years.

During his meeting with current LCCC students, Di Pasquale focused heavily on financial services and the student evaluation process.

He said he believes in addressing the issues that affect students the most, like instructors’ performances, could affect student financial aid. Di Pasquale also said he was concerned with LCCC’s budget, and how the process of distributing money throughout the college might change.

Di Pasquale, who earned his master of science degree from Northeastern University in Boston, also served as a member of Rhode Island’s Board of Education as Commissioner. This, he said, is an experience that gives him unique insight when it comes to LCCC’s Early College High School program.

“We have to work with the high schools to better prepare our students,” Di Pasquale told Lorain county community members. “The whole trend today is preparing students for college. If we work closely with the high schools, they will understand what proficiencies they will need in order to be successful academically in college courses. With summer courses in math and English, these students could enter here and not have to worry about intermediate classes, and instead focus on college level courses. My plan is to work closely with the local districts, and the various faculty members who teach different subjects, to make that possible,” Di Pasquale stated.

“We are the solution to the issues in the local workforce. Including the president, we as a faculty need to keep learning.”

Ray Michael Di Pasquale

Di Pasqaule said there are a few primary issues facing LCCC that he has noticed during his research of the school and visits to campus. “There are three challenges that other community colleges are facing, and those are budgeting, continuing our role in the community, and our role in the workforce,” he said.

“We are going to keep the finances stable for the next several years by retaining enrolled students,” Di Pasquale told county residents. “Because of how tuition driven the campus is, finding ways to keep them enrolled and holding the institution to the degree that it has caused itself to become over the years is one of the reasons why it is a challenge worth finding a solution to and for,” he said.

During this forum, Di Pasquale showed great respect to Dr. Roy Church. “One of the best things that Dr. Church has done has been being an intricate part of the community,” he said. “This helps us get the votes we need to continue the direction the school is heading. We need to start campaigning now. We are the solution to the issues in the local workforce,” Di Pasquale told Lorain county residents.

                                                                                                                       

Kristin Hohman

Editor-in-Chief

MB

Dr. Marcia Ballinger meets with community members on April 8.

Dr. Marcia Ballinger, LCCC’s current provost and vice president for academic and learner services, participated in forums with faculty, students, and community members on April 8.

“I first want to say that I am very honored and humbled to be standing here and talking about the future of Lorain County Community College,” Ballinger said during her town-hall meeting with members of the Lorain County community.

Local residents showed interest in Ballinger’s opinion on the recent success of LCCC, and how it has grown and changed over the last several years. “The reason I believe that this college has been so successful is because in it has taken the time to really become not just ingrained in the community, it is because it is part of the entire community and it is created to serve the changing parts of the community,” Ballinger said. “As I look at change, I look at it in terms of the community’s needs,” she continued. “As a learning organization we can’t stop. We are continually changing and innovating.”

I believe that today’s community college presidents should be in deep and strategic communication with the community. We need to motivate and inspire and manage the change that needs to occur so they are working in tandem together.”

Current LCCC students, who met with Ballinger the afternoon of April 8, heard the candidate’s plans if she is to become the next president of the college.

Local residents showed interest in Ballinger’s opinion on the recent success of LCCC, and how it has grown and changed over the last several years. “The reason I believe that this college has been so successful is because in it has taken the time to really become not just ingrained in the community, it is because it is part of the entire community and it is created to serve the changing parts of the community,” Ballinger said. “As I look at change, I look at it in terms of the community’s needs,” she continued. “As a learning organization we can’t stop. We are continually changing and innovating. I believe that today’s community college presidents should be in deep and strategic communication with the community. We need to motivate and inspire and manage the change that needs to occur so they are working in tandem together.”

Current LCCC students, who met with Ballinger the afternoon of April 8, heard the candidate’s plans if she is to become the next president of the college.

Ballinger said she is interested in creating a student advisory council that works directly with the president. This would consist of a group of individual students who would work with president’s office to address student concerns, giving the head of the college a firsthand account of the students’ experiences on campus. Ballinger also added that this council would assist with the need for transparency between the administration, faculty and staff, and students.

“As a learning organization we can’t stop. We are continually changing and innovating.”

Dr. Marcia Ballinger

Ballinger also relayed to students that she intends to improve faculty evaluations, which are filled out by students at the end of the semester for each individual instructor that student has. Currently, the evaluations are used as a method of advancement for full-time faculty. She believes that these evaluations could be repurposed to better serve the LCCC community.

“Teaching is at the core of our being,” Ballinger said of LCCC.

Lorain county residents were curious about the collaborations Ballinger has been a part of within the community. “A question I ask myself when discussing with my colleagues throughout the county is; what are the programs should we be developing next to aid those in our county?” Ballinger said. “I get excited about where we have been and now, where we are going.”

Lorain county residents were curious about what projects Ballinger is most interested to implement. “I have my eyes on 2019 for the next levy campaign because our general operating levy is going to be expiring. We would like to keep our recognition of having one of the lowest tuitions in the state of Ohio, and with this levy we could continue that for the benefit of the students.”