Drew Scofield answering a question from a student in the JRNM 151 class.

Drew Scofield answering a question from a student in the JRNM 151 class.

Cassie Wise
JRNM 151 Student

“Get started with The Collegian” is the advice Drew Scofield gave to the Journalism 151 class on Thursday. Scofield, a former Lorain County Community College student, came to college majoring in web design, but fell in love with journalism instead. Scofield got his start right here, working for The Collegian, and is now the assignment editor for Channel 5 News.
After leaving Lorain County Community College, Scofield got a job working for The Morning Journal, eventually becoming their top crime reporter. From fires to shootings, car crashes to kidnappings, Scofield has covered it all in Lorain County. Seeing a lot of horrific events, one may want to opt out of this job and find a new career, but not Scofield. He lives for the adrenaline that comes when the SWAT team gets called, or when his police scanner proclaims a live shooter. “I’ve gotten death threats before from people being arrested,” but these calls are what Scofield loves the most.
The only time Scofield had trouble with his job was when he covered a house fire, and the firefighters tried to revive a dog, who sadly passed away from the fumes of the flames. “Seeing the firefighter give the dog CPR, but the dog not reviving,” was the hardest thing Scofield has ever had to witness. But, when going to a crime scene a reporter can’t just start asking questions, Scofield must “put [himself] in their shoes.” Scofield isn’t just reporting grisly crime scenes, but he is comforting those who have lost loved ones and is helping them get their story across to the public.
“Newspapers are not dying” as long as the world keeps turning, there will always be news to report and people reading and buying these newspapers. Journalism isn’t a dying field, but it is evolving. Journalists no longer just write stories, but they must also “know how to take photos, videos, fact-check, edit, etc.” to always have a consistent job.  “You will always have a job if you make yourself valuable,” is what he kept saying. Scofield has worked very hard from being an editor for The Collegian, to being a crime reporter for The Morning Journal, and is now working in broadcast. But, he really emphasized that “reporters aren’t the only ones reporting the news,” witnesses and citizens in general are the top news source with social media being the new mainstream way to receive breaking news updates. “Social media is the king,” he explained.