A Student Publication of Lorain County Community College

Community honors fallen officer – LCCC grad

State Highway Patrol Trooper Valez was killed on duty on Sept. 15.

Andrew Krause JRNM 151 “He had one hour left in his shift,” Rey Torres Jr. said. During that hour, on Sept. 15, Torres’ first cousin, Ohio State Highway Patrol Trooper Kenneth Velez, was killed in the line of duty. Velez, who graduated in…

Campus remembers fallen, honors heros on 9/11 anniversary

Traci Kogut| The Collegian
Members of the Lorain County Community College Student Senate hang up thank you notes from students during this year’s Sept. 11 memorial. The notes will be delivered to local police and fire departments on Friday, Sept. 16.

    Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief On Monday, Sept. 12, the Lorain County Community College campus came together to honor and remember those lost during the attacks of September 11, 2001. Members of the LCCC Student Senate accepted thank you notes…

Society of Women Engineers partners with U.S. Army

By Kerri Klatt JRNM-151   Lorain County Community College’s Society of Women Engineers and the United States Army have joined together for three programs starting fall semester to improve army recruitment and retention rates. These programs are provided at no…

First year, first steps

Lorain County Community College's new president, Dr. Marcia Ballinger has high expectations for the institution. 
Photo by Kristin Hohman

  Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief “I was just absolutely thrilled to be named as the sixth president of Lorain County Community College,” said Dr. Marcia Ballinger, the newly minted president of the institution. “I’m just honored that the Board of Trustees…

Dryden selected as interim provost

Tim Krezman Staff Writer Dr. Jonathan Dryden was named the Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic and Learner Services when Dr. Marcia Ballinger was selected as Dr. Roy Church’s successor as Lorain County Community College president. Dryden said there…

Scholarship created in honor of Dr. Roy Church

Alexandra Sauer | The Collegian
Lorain County Community College President Dr. Roy Church at The Legacy of Leadership gala on April 25.

Rebecca Marion Advertising Manager The Lorain County Community College presented the Legacy of Leadership Gala on April 25 to celebrate the retirement and many accomplishments of its president Dr. Roy Church. Not only does the event seek to acknowledge the…

Ballinger named 6th president of LCCC

Dr. Marcia Ballinger
2016

Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief “Community is the middle name of this college, and I think one of the hallmarks of this institution is being responsive to the unique needs of the community. I look forward to doing that,” said Dr. Marcia Ballinger,…

Community honors fallen officer – LCCC grad

State Highway Patrol Trooper Velez was killed on duty on Sept. 15.

Andrew Krause
JRNM 151

“He had one hour left in his shift,” Rey Torres Jr. said. During that hour, on Sept. 15, Torres’ first cousin, Ohio State Highway Patrol Trooper Kenneth Velez, was killed in the line of duty. Velez, who graduated in Police Science from Lorain County Community College, was struck by a driver while conducting a traffic stop on I-90 near the Warren Road exit. He is survived by his three children.

Trooper Velez’s end of watch was honored Wednesday Sept. 21 afternoon at Lorain County Community College’s Ewing Field House, where family, students, teachers, fellow law enforcement officers and members of the community paid their last respects. The funeral was held Sept. 22, also on the LCCC campus.

“Many people in the community, even outside the community, are feeling this loss,” Torres explained. “The support Kenny has been getting is amazing.” This feeling was evident by the shear number of visitors who came to pay their respects at Trooper Velez’s wake, which saw a line of people of stretching from the inside of the Ewing Field House, through the atrium and all the way down the sidewalk leading to the parking lot.

Outside of LCCC, the surrounding communities themselves collectively honored Velez’s 27 years as a law enforcement officer. The Cleveland Indians paid tribute to Velez by displaying a memorial picture during a recent home game, a post on the Ohio Going Blue Facebook page highlighting Velez’s character went viral, being shared over 7,000 times, a high school football game between Amherst and Berea-Midpark had attendees and players sporting the color blue in solidarity, and Governor John Kasich has ordered all flags at half-staff for Velez’s funeral.

“[He was a] family-oriented, hard worker who loved his job and family,” Torres said.

James D. McManus, Assistant Professor/Coordinator of Criminal Justice, Social Sciences and Human Services at LCCC, weighed in on the risks of being a law enforcement officer and how it affects one’s family life, saying “kiss your loved ones good-bye because you’ll never know if you’ll get a second chance,” highlighting the daily dangers peace officers face while on duty.

Even with the risks and dangers associated with the occupation, the main objective remains protecting and serving our local communities, with McManus stating “when you lay your head on the pillow at the end of the day, you hope you made a difference.” According to ODMP.org, a memorial page that tracks law enforcement officer deaths, Trooper Kenneth Velez was the fifth law enforcement officer in the state of Ohio to fall in the line of duty in 2016. Nationally, he was one of ninety officers killed on duty this year.

“Say What?!”

LCCC’s international students on strange American phrases or customs

Rebecca Marion

Ads Manager

Vivian Shin, South Korea Graphic Design

Vivian Shin, South Korea
Graphic Design

Language

Ruwaidah: “When we came here, I was working at McDonald’s, and people speak fast. So, sometimes I do not understand anything and they have to repeat for me slowly. But now I can understand them. I understand almost everything.

Culture

Vivian: “I think the culture is very different.” The people in the states are so kind. When I walk around most people said ‘oh, your earrings are so [nice]. It’s so different in Korea. Most people don’t say anything. America is a big

Tony Barhoom, Lebanon Mechanical Engineer

Tony Barhoom, Lebanon
Mechanical Engineer

country and each state has its own style. I like America because I can wear [my] unique style.”

Ruwaidah: “People here have more freedom. They can live together, but in my culture, in Lebanon, we can’t kiss someone if you’re not married. Here, you can [get] divorced. But in our culture, the church doesn’t give us the choice.

Elisa Batista, France Business Administration

Elisa Batista, France
Business Administration

Elisa: “It’s difficult to have American friends. I know when I speak with American guys, they are very nice to me, but they’re not friends. I think it’s very difficult to have American friends because nobody in class speaks [with each other]. It’s very strange because all people are very cool, but at the same time. We aren’t friends. Here everyone opens the door when you arrive. When people come to class, they don’t say hello to the teacher. Its very strange because the basic polite things in France aren’t the same as here.”

Weather

Ruwaidah: “Here the weather is different sometime it rains, sometimes it’s hot. In my country we have four seasons.”

Food

Elisa: “Here, all things are bigger and you can eat all the time. Restaurants are open all night. There is fast food everywhere. It’s strange you can get french fries everyday.”

Arham:“The Starbucks’ sizes, they call it tall. That’s weird. In my country it’s not what they say. But over here, a large coke, it’s hug. In my country the large is the same as a small over here. Everything’s the opposite.”

School

Elisa: “In France we don’t have the same structure of University because here you take all courses you want. You have a major where you take course. If your major is business you can take also

Arham Shahab Pakistan Accounting Major

Arham Shahab Pakistan Accounting Major

Ruwaidah Barhoom, Lebanon Ultrasound Tech

Ruwaidah Barhoom,
Lebanon
Ultrasound Tech

photography, in France it’s not like that. I can’t choose my course. I just chose my major.”

“In France university is free you just pay for the paper you use. It’s expensive here because we don’t pay for education.”

“Books here are very strange for me because in France in university we don’t have text books. The teachers creates exercises for you and I think it’s better because you learn the logic from the teacher.”

Measurements

Arham : Over there we measure the weather in Celsius; over here, it’s in Fahrenheit. Even at the gym when you go to work out over there everything’s in Kg and over here it’s in pounds so you need to convert it into your calculator first.”

Campus remembers fallen, honors heros on 9/11 anniversary

 

 

Traci Kogut| The Collegian Members of the Lorain County Community College Student Senate hang up thank you notes from students during this year’s Sept. 11 memorial. The notes will be delivered to local police and fire departments on Friday, Sept. 16.

Traci Kogut| The Collegian
Members of the Lorain County Community College Student Senate hang up thank you notes from students during this year’s Sept. 11 memorial. The notes will be delivered to local police and fire departments on Friday, Sept. 16.

Kristin Hohman

Editor-in-Chief

On Monday, Sept. 12, the Lorain County Community College campus came together to honor and remember those lost during the attacks of September 11, 2001. Members of the LCCC Student Senate accepted thank you notes from students, faculty, and staff to be displayed in the College Center building. The notes will be delivered to local fire departments and police stations to honor those who serve our community.

“We are going with a trend that’s been happening over the past couple years that been getting away from more a memorial heading more towards the service aspect of 9/11,” said student senator, Brendan Bennett. “We are encouraging students to look at different opportunities in the community and also within the college to volunteer.”

“My step father just passed away last week and he was a firefighter who was in service when 9/11 happened,” said fitness management major, Andrew Smith. “He was a part of the precinct who went over to lend support to (New York) and he really changed my view on how I thought of the country as a whole,” he said. “What I wrote on the card was ‘Thank you Albert for being a real dad and a real hero’. He never liked the word hero. He wouldn’t let us call him that, but he was a firefighter for 25 years, what do you think you are?” Smith asked.

“I wrote thank you to all the firefighters and police officers,” said Alexandria Cheek, an early childhood development major. “I know a lot of people died in it so I know that they helped out a lot. I definitely appreciate it.”

“I think it’s really important because this is the generation that 9/11 happened while we were all alive,” said student senator Jaden Cataldo. “Our generation as college students can tell you where we were and what we were doing. So it’s still a common ground for everyone to talk about.”

The thank you notes will be hand-delivered to local first responders on Friday, Sept. 16.

Rebecca Marion contributed to this story.

Scholarship created in memory of LCCC staffer

 

Randolph Digges

JRNM 151

LCCC staff member, Bob Flyer passed away on Sept. 2 due to cancer of the bile ducts. A scholarship has been created in his honor to aid student veterans.

LCCC staff member Bob Flyer passed away on Sept. 2 due to cancer of the bile ducts. A scholarship has been created in his honor to aid student veterans.

Lorain County Community College staff member, Bob Flyer, passed away Sept. 2 due to cholangiocarcinoma, cancer of the bile ducts. For the past two years, Flyer, 68, held the position of the Assistant to the Vice President for Administrative Services. He began his career at LCCC as the Director of Physical Plant Operations in 2005.
“Professionally Bob was a great asset to the college,” said Laura Carissimi, Director of Purchasing & Facilities Planning at LCCC. “ Bob was dedicated to the college and freely shared his deep knowledge and professional experience,” she stated.
Dr. Marcia Ballinger, President of LCCC, was saddened by Flyer’s sudden death.
“Our entire campus community is deeply saddened by the passing of our colleague and friend Bob Flyer. Bob’s impact on our campus in the last 11 years will have a lasting legacy for our students, employees, and community,” Ballinger said, “I believe he took the greatest pride in helping to create the Veteran’s Lounge in the College Center.”
Flyer was a member of the United States Navy in the Vietnam War. “He was passionate about veterans,” said Dale Lucas, LCCC’s current Director of Physical Plant Operations. “It was a great loss,” Lucas continued. “Bob was a wealth of knowledge, a great mentor, and cared about everyone’s success.”
Flyer, a Painesville resident, is survived by his wife of 33 years, Anita; his son, Christopher; his brothers, Tony and Tom “Robin” Flyer; and his mother-in-law, Joannie Layne.
Carissimi remembers a colleague who, while having a tough reputation among contractors, she recalls being a ‘teddy-bear’. “While he was tough and exacting on contractors, he was well respected as, while he demanded high performance standards, he was fair, and worked to find ‘win-win’ solutions to the problems that inevitably emerge in construction and renovation projects,” Carissimi stated. “Bob was a kind-hearted person who loved animals,” she said. “He enjoyed witty humor, such as Rocky and Bullwinkle, Mel Brooks’ films, and the host of email jokes he circulated.”
Lucas added that Flyer had a personal impact on his life. “He helped me immensely on the job as well as in my personal life,” Lucas recalled. “He encouraged my daughters to go into College Credit Plus, and my wife to pursue her associate’s degree and continue through the University Partnership.”
A memorial service was held on Sept. 9 at Monreal Funeral Home in Eastlake.
Ballinger plans to honor Flyer’s legacy with a new scholarship opportunity for veterans. “To honor Bob, we have established the Bob Flyer Memorial Student Veteran’s Fund,” Ballinger said. “This fund is through the LCCC Foundation, and will help support our student veterans.”

 

Kristin Hohman contributed to this story.

Stocker season starts with a kick

Renee McAdow

JRNM 151

Murder on the Nile, the stage adaption of renowned mystery author Agatha Christie’s book Death on the Nile, performed by New York’s Aquila Theater, is the first of many performances coming to the Hoke Theater stage in the Stocker Arts Center. It will be held on Oct. 17 at 7:30 p.m. and the cost per student-ticket is $10, $33 and $40 for non-student tickets. The show is set on a paddle steamer cruising along the Nile River in 1940s Egypt, where all seems normal as class, money, and reputation are all at stake in different ways for the paddle steamer’s passengers. Deceit, theft, and murder soon turn the once-pleasant cruise into a dangerous whodunit mystery.
“Murder on the Nile will be interesting, especially for anyone who is a Christie fan, or anybody who is a fan of mysteries,” said Janet Herman Barlow, the Director of Stocker Arts Center.
In conjunction with the college’s Arts and Humanities department, the center will be conducting a week long series of workshops and performances with Joanna Rush, an actress, playwright, and former Rockette.
“They’re going to do workshops with theater students, they’re going to do a workshop on sexual assault, and they’ll do a talk back after a performance of Kick,” said Barlow.
Rush will be performing her one-woman show Kick this October in the Cirigliano Studio Theater, as well as speaking about her experience with rape and how she got through it. Rush wrote the show, Lynne Taylor-Corbett, tony-nominated director and choreographer, directed the production.
“It’ll be interesting to see if people are willing to come to it, because it’s not a famous play, though it did have an off-Broadway run this last fall. We hope people will come to it because it’s a really important topic,” said Barlow.
Kick is not the only show with more serious topics scheduled to appear at Stocker Arts Center this October. Curtain Up at the Cotton Club will be gracing the Hoke Theater stage.
“[The show] gives a history of the Cotton Club, which pretty much every major African-American artist started at in that era,” said Barlow, “It will have really wonderful music, but you’ll also learn about the history of the club.”
The show is to be put on by The Musical Theater Project and features the full Cleveland Jazz Orchestra. The performance aims to take the audience back to Harlem in the 1920s and 30s, to the citadel of the New York Jazz Scene. It was a bigoted place embodying American racism, where a “whites-only” admittance policy was in place for the audience, forcing the Club’s performers to eat in the kitchens.
There are several more performances and guests coming to the Stocker Arts Center, ranging from visiting musicians to art showcases. Information and a calendar of upcoming events can be found by visiting their website, alongside visiting the box office located inside the Stocker Arts Center.
Since the 1980s, the Stocker Arts Center has been a cornerstone of learning at Lorain County Community College. From visual art galleries to the fall film series, the Stocker Arts Center handles it all. Due to the many art forms the college offers there is no shortage of events scheduled in the center’s theaters and gallery.
While the Stocker Arts Center books the film series, the art gallery, and the live events; they also work in conjunction with the Arts and Humanities department. Theatrical performances as well as the LCCC Civic Orchestra’s shows have their places in the 2016-2017 Stocker Arts Center season line-up.
For more details, visit stockercenter.com.

LCCC named most affordable

Special to The Collegian

Lorain County Community College has been named one of the most affordable community colleges in the nation by the U.S. Department of Education.

“Affordability is key to keeping LCCC accessible to our community’s residents,” commented LCCC President Marcia Ballinger. “This national recognition reflects the long-standing commitment to ensuring that quality higher education is within everyone’s reach. We’re grateful for the tremendous support from Lorain County residents since LCCC was created as Ohio’s first community college with a permanent campus in July 1963,” Ballinger stated.

LCCC was one of only two Ohio two-year institutions to be included in the list of institutions recognized for its affordability. Eastern Gateway Community College also made the list ranking 39th. LCCC’s net price of $3,020, which is $4,327 lower than the national average ($7,347) for the sector. LCCC ranked 30th nationally out of 93 public, two-year colleges that made the Lowest Net Prices report issued by the College Affordability and Transparency Center (CATC). This report reflects the lowest (bottom 10 percent) academic year charges for each sector.

The U.S. Department of Education calculates average net price subtracting the average amount of federal, state/local government, or institutional grant or scholarship aid from the total cost of attendance. Total cost of attendance is the sum of published tuition and required fees, books and supplies, and the weighted average for room and board and other expenses. Average net price is for full-time beginning undergraduate students who received grant or scholarship aid from federal, state or local governments, or the institution.

Pushing for a Presence

Michael Flanigan

JRMN 151

Attend an event on the Lorain County Community College campus, there is a good chance the Student Senate had something to do with it. The Student Senate acts as a bridge between the students and the administrators at the college as well as getting new student clubs off the ground.

“The Student Senate is the voice of all students on campus, at the Learning centers, in the university partnership, international, or online. ” said Student Senate Vice President, Alex Moen.

Their goal for the school year is to establish a larger presence on campus and by doing so, making a community of students on campus. The Senate allows students to get involved on campus and establish friendships through a variety of events.

They work to improve their events every day and make the community even larger by making their biggest push on social media yet to try and reach as many students as possible. The Student Senate has big plans for this year and their office is open to the public if any student has questions or concerns.

“No matter what the goals are that we set for the semester, they always have one main objective: that they will better the student experience on all platforms of LCCC,” Moen said.

The Senate offices found at CC 236, on the second floor of the College Center building. Students are always welcome to stop by. Students are also encouraged to attend their bi-monthly meetings on the first and third Wednesday of every month from 3pm to 4pm in room CC 236. These meetings go over the upcoming events planned and even the Senate’s goals including this year’s goals of creating an annual scholarship, working on bringing international and domestic students together, and having a larger presence on campus.

 

Society of Women Engineers partners with U.S. Army

By Kerri Klatt
JRNM-151

 

Lorain County Community College’s Society of Women Engineers and the United States Army have joined together for three programs starting fall semester to improve army recruitment and retention rates. These programs are provided at no cost to the college and include educational incentives for students. Students stand to benefit, as programs will provide a structured plan and tools to succeed.

“This is an opportunity to generate STEM awareness to reach women and minorities to aid them in working to their full potential, as well as putting LCCC in a national spotlight,” said Ramona Anand, faculty advisor of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE).

ADVAB Career Exploration Program (CEP) is a career program that can provide students with a structured plan as well as assist the student in career, educational, and vocational planning. This program helps students to identify their academic strengths and weakness, while program assessments can also be practice for the SAT and ACT tests.

An online program, March2 Success, is sponsored by the U.S. Army. This interactive program allows teachers to track students as well as mentor them and allows students access for test preparations. This program includes 30 hours of instructions and over 50 online lessons. These lessons range from basic math to engineering.

The ConAP, is a program offered for Army soldiers, veterans, and Reserve soldiers enrolled in college. This program recognizes potential Army training and job experience as college credit.

“There is no enlistment needed for any students,” Staff Sergeant Luke Jamison, from the U.S. Army explained.

The U.S. Army offers several opportunities for financial assistance, such as cash enlistment bonuses, tuition assistance, a college loan repayment program, and the Montgomery GI Bill, which provides education and training benefits to eligible members.

This collaboration will be formally announced at the “Careers in STEM” event October 4, 2016 8:30am to 11:30am at the CC building.

For more detailed information on these programs, please contact SSG Luke A. Jamison at, (440) 254-6351 (email Luke.A.Jamison.mil@mail.mil), or Ramona Anand at  (440) 366-4930 (email ranand@lorainccc.edu).

Pokemon Go game catches campus attention

Kent Springborn Jr.

Staff Writer

Pokémon has recently celebrated its 20th anniversary and with the North American release of the mobile game, Pokémon Go, on July 6, there has been a recent resurgence of interest in the franchise. The app has been

Renee McAdow | The Collegian A screenshot from the Pokemon Go app shows how the game’s augmented reality places Pokemon in the player’s surroundings. This ‘Bellsprout’ was found in the campus’s quad.

Renee McAdow | The Collegian
A screenshot from the Pokemon Go app shows how the game’s augmented reality places Pokemon in the player’s surroundings. This ‘Bellsprout’ was found in the campus’s quad.

downloaded by more than 130 million people worldwide, making it one of the most used apps in 2016 just within its first few months of release. One of the major selling points to those who have downloaded the game is that there is an augmented reality feature that places a virtual Pokémon into the real world via the phone’s camera. This makes it as though there is an actual Pokémon directly in front of the player.

There has been a mix of new and old fans of Pokémon playing the game and it has encouraged people to get out and be active while also catching various Pokémon. Many fans of the franchise were excited at the prospect of being able to go out and catch Pokémon. “I was pretty happy that everyone around the world that was a Pokémon fan was finally going to be able to be a ‘Pokémon Trainer’ in real life,” said Nicole Roberts, a Culinary Arts major at LCCC, “I was pretty excited to play, especially when it would influence exercise as well as getting me out of the house. I thought it would be a very positive thing.” Roberts has been a Pokémon fan since she can remember and chalks it up to her dad and older sister for getting her into the franchise.

However, not everything surrounding Pokémon Go has been positive. There have been reports of people trespassing and not being attentive while playing the game. It has gotten to the point where Niantic, the game’s developer, has added warning messages at the startup of the game telling players “Do Not Trespass,” “Be Aware of Your Surroundings,” and “Don’t Drive While Playing Pokémon Go.” Niantic has also been working on fixing a few bugs and issues with the game that haven’t quite worked out or received negative feedback.

One of Niantic’s recent updates took away a feature that would inform players how far away a Pokémon was from them. According to Niantic, the reason this feature was taken out was due to the fact that it didn’t exactly work. When this update rolled out, a lot of fans were upset and felt that it made it more difficult to locate Pokémon.

There have also been instances where players set their phones’ GPS and so they don’t have to leave their house or be active in order to catch Pokémon. Niantic has responded to these players and in some cases, they’ve permanently banned them from playing Pokémon Go. “I’m glad that Niantic is doing their best to stop cheaters,” said Roberts in response to hearing this, “Playing a game how it’s supposed to be played is better than breaking it.”

Roberts believes that there are some players who have taken the game too seriously and have taken it a bit too far when it comes to trash-talking other players who are on other teams than they are. “That’s when you’ve taken it too far. You can trash talk for fun and just have fun with people, but actually going out of your way to hurt people because of the team they chose is just wrong,” Roberts said, “All I can say is ‘It’s just a game, treat it as such.’”

Despite all of the negative reactions towards some aspects of Pokémon Go, it still has the honor of being one of the most downloaded apps within its first few months of release and it has taken the franchise’s catch phrase of “Gotta Catch ‘Em All!” to a whole new different level and meaning than it has been in years.

 

Commodores gets run off field in a 5-0 debacle

Mark Perez-Krywany

Staff Writer

They say that defense wins championships, but as the Lorain County Community College men’s soccer team took on the Lakeland Community College Lakers, that infamous saying was contradicted. It was evident right away that the Commodores would be on the defensive when Lakers’ forward Mohamed Doumbia had a wide open scoring opportunity within a few seconds of kickoff. The pressure just piled on as the game progressed.

The Lakers’ ball dominance set the pace and controlled the game. Their passing dissected the Commodores’ defense and had a high quantity of corner kicks and set pieces giving them multiple chances at goal. Lakers’ Doumbia was one goal shy of a hat trick, which is three goals in a game.

The only offensive weapon LCCC had was the counterattack, which is when a player clears the threat of a goal, and a forward gets the ball and sprints down the pitch get scoring opportunities, a common form of offense.

It was clear that luck happened to be on the Lakers’ side after one controversial play. A foul was called near the penalty area, leading to a free-kick that hit the post and was parried, or knocked to another Lakers’ player. In this case, it meant another goal for Mohamed Doumbia.

In another stroke of luck, Lakers’ Raymond Salukombo received a cross from the left wing, or corner. He had a one on one situation with the Commodores goalkeeper, which turned into a scramble between the two, as the ball slipped past the keeper and was knocked in by Salukombo.

“There was not a lot of talking and we were out of shape,” said Commodores’ center back Jacob Sheriff. The team doesn’t practice enough and was put together “last minute,” Sheriff added.

As a result, the team was not united.

“We weren’t outskilled,” said head coach Nathan Goins. “We were out conditioned.”

The team’s formation is a 4-4-2, with center midfielders flat. Coach Goins likes this formation and said that as long as your players are willing to hustle and communicate, it can be very effective. The problem in the match against Lakeland CC was that no one was willing to hustle due to being out of shape.  Goins believes there is no need to change the formation and that the game plan will work as long as the team does not abandon the strategy when things are going their way.

The Commodores’ next match is home on Thursday, Sept. 15 at 4:00pm against Walsh JV and takes on Lakeland CC again on Wednesday, Sept. 21.