A Student Publication of Lorain County Community College

Former student arrested on kidnapping charges

Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief Former Lorain County Community College student and former student senator Justin Christian was arrested on Dec. 2 in his Lorain home. Christian is  charged with rape and kidnapping in connection with the abduction of a 6-year-old Cleveland…

Students impacted by transportation cuts

The above graphs shows how Lorain County residents voted for the 0.25 percent tax levy, funding that would have been split between transportation and general use The information was gathered from the Lorain County Board of Elections.

Renee McAdow Staff Writer “I live in a place where it is a 30 minute walk and a three minute drive to campus. My friends help me get to school, but I can’t always depend on them,” said Lorain County…

LCCC staffer gets dream job

Rebecca Marion | The Collegian  LCCC's Vernice Jackson was one of 50 applicants chosen as a docent for the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C.

Rebecca Marion Managing Editor As a young girl Vernice Jackson never imagined that she would have the opportunity to volunteer for the institution that nourished her love of history, the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C. But now, she’ll have the…

Suicide on campus: What is the cost?

Genesis Rivera | The Collegian  The cost of suicide per the most recent available data from the Centers for Disease Control.

Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief Last in a 3-part series The effects of his suicide attempt are something that Lorain County Community College student Andrew Krause still grapples with on a consistent basis. “It’s an everyday thing,” Krause explained. “It’s no longer…

Students navigate book costs

Traci Kogut JRNM 151 Student “I bought my textbook for a penny on Amazon,” said Arnita Marn, a non-profit administration major at Lorain County Community College, who described how she saved a significant amount of money for a textbook that…

Former student arrested on kidnapping charges

Kristin Hohman

Editor-in-Chief

Former Lorain County Community College student and former student senator Justin Christian was arrested on Dec. 2 in his Lorain home. Christian is  charged with rape and kidnapping in connection with the abduction of a 6-year-old Cleveland girl from her home on May 21, according to published reports.

“I’m shocked,” said Benjamin Colon Nieves, vice president of LCCC student senate. “He was a likable person.”

Christian is also linked to the attempted abduction of a 10-year-old Elyria girl in February.

The investigation spanned several months and involved numerous law enforcement agencies including the FBI, the Elyria Police Department and the Lorain Police Department.

LCCC had no prior knowledge of the investigation into Christian, according to Tracy Green, LCCC’s vice president for strategic and institutional development.
“We learned this morning that Mr. Justin Christian was arrested,” Green said in a statement. “Mr. Christian was a student at Lorain County Community College for the past two years and served as a student senator during a portion of his time at Lorain County Community College. Obviously at this point, Mr. Christian is not on campus and, in accordance with our campus code of conduct, has been immediately suspended and banned from campus. Our focus is allowing law enforcement to be able to complete their investigation.”

Investigators are still exploring possible links between Christian and two attempted abductions in Lorain County that occurred on Feb. 25 .

The announcement of Christian’s arrest was made during a press conference by the FBI, Cleveland Police Department and other law enforcement agencies on the morning of Dec. 5. He is scheduled for arraignment on Dec. 8.

 

Students impacted by transportation cuts

Renee McAdow

Staff Writer

“I live in a place where it is a 30 minute walk and a three minute drive to campus. My friends help me get to school, but I can’t always

The above graphs shows how Lorain County residents voted for the 0.25 percent tax levy, funding that would have been split between transportation and general use The information was gathered from the Lorain County Board of Elections.

depend on them,” said Lorain County Community College international student and student senate member Jinnie Lee.

Transportation, or rather the lack thereof in Lorain County, is in decline. Due to budget cuts and failed tax levies it only serves to continue in a downwards spiral. The latest attempt, on the November 2016 ballot, to try and prevent further decline came in the form of a tax levy that proposed a 0.25 percent tax split between general funding and public transit.

Federally only $1 million is supplied for public transit in Ohio and only $120,000 is provided by the state. In an effort to balance out the state budget, Ohio Governor John Kasich cut the county budgets, resulting in a loss of funding for county services.

“We are only able to put about $50,000 in for transit, which enables us [Lorain County] to run four bus routes,” said Matt Lundy, the president of the Lorain County Board of Commissioners.  Lorain County received $9 million from Columbus for the sustainability of the local government, but now due to aforementioned budget cuts they only receive $3 million total. The greatest source of revenue comes from the county’s sales tax that currently sits at 6.5 percent, but 5.75 percent of that tax goes right back into the state for state budget concerns rather than to the county.

“Decreased funding leads to reduction in service,” said Pamela Novak, the Lorain County Transit chief finance officer.

Over the past decade, local government departments have been cut in an attempt to save sorely needed money.

“Our street department only has 14 people servicing 55,000 people in Lorain County,” Lundy provided as an example of the drastic budget cuts.

Lundy is an advocate for transportation on the board, stating a concern for the declining state of public transit in the county.

In June 2015, early polling showed that county residents were in favor of supporting a tax levy that would fund public transit, but two-thirds of the commissioners board were not comfortable with a levy solely for transit when it could be combined with a levy for general funding. The 0.25 percent levy was a compromise that marginally satisfied both sides.

“The populace did not like the mingling of ideas,” said Lundy. “It was a five year commitment.”

The levy was placed on the November 2016 ballot, and the response overwhelmingly shut down the proposed levy: 97,602 Against to 33,959 For.

“[The] county government always has difficulty passing bills designed to help,” said Lundy. “The problem isn’t going to go away on its own, it [the government] needs money to accomplish anything.”

Change is never easy to come by, especially when taxes are involved, according to Lundy.

“People need to be willing to change, striving to take the next step. Times change so people need to as well,” said Lundy. “We also need to be able to have a disagreement and come away still on good standing.”

LCCC works closely with the commissioners to better the economic gaps in the community, such as those pertaining to transit. LCCC is a stepping stone for people seeking to better their skills, which is helpful now that job positions are becoming increasingly tied to wages earned.

The need for better transportation not only helps the students, but it would provide the campus with more accessibility to those who wish to attend but cannot due to the lack of a car or other means of transit.

“There is already a bus that is going to the school apartments, I just hope that it could stop near our street as well. There are lots of students living around the area who don’t have a car. I keep requesting a change but there have been none,” Lee said.

LCCC staffer gets dream job

Rebecca Marion

Managing Editor

Rebecca Marion | The Collegian LCCC's Vernice Jackson was one of 50 applicants chosen as a docent for the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C.

Rebecca Marion | The Collegian LCCC’s Vernice Jackson was one of 50 applicants chosen as a docent for the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C.

As a young girl Vernice Jackson never imagined that she would have the opportunity to volunteer for the institution that nourished her

love of history, the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C. But now, she’ll have the opportunity to do so at the newly built National Museum of African American History and Culture.

When Jackson, an experiential education professional at Lorain County Community College,  was little she used to spend her Sundays at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History mesmerized by the exhibits. Years later, she still vividly remembers the experience, recalling how empty exhibits would unnerve her. “So sometimes I might be the only person in a particular gallery and some of them were kind of scary, so sometimes I would go stand outside in the hall and wait till other people came in,” said Jackson.

Many of Jackson’s educational accomplishments are in compliment with her passion for history. She has earned a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Baldwin-Wallace College and a Master of Science in Organizational Development and Analysis from Case Western Reserve University. On top of several degrees, Jackson helped create Women in History, a non-profit organization that breathes life into the women of American history by portraying their roles in major events.

“I talked about the fact that I was born and raised in D.C. and that I grew up spending time in the Smithsonian and how it always intrigued me.”

Now coming towards the end of her career at LCCC, Jackson thought the next step in her life should involve giving back to her hometown of Washington D.C.  To Jackson, the opportunity to teach history through a different lens using the Smithsonian exhibits is vitally important to understanding how the United States was built. “It’s important to have African Americans recognize that the development of the United States was on the back of their ancestors and that’s it’s not something to be ashamed of; it’s something to be proud of because of the resilience of these people we are here today,” said Jackson.

Out of more than 1,000 applicants vying for the position of docent, Jackson was one of fifty selected for the role.  She made it through the first round of applicants after applying online. The next step was to submit a five-minute video detailing the qualities that made her best suited for the job.

“Essentially, I talked about the fact that I was born and raised in D.C. and that I grew up spending time in the Smithsonian and how it always intrigued me,” Jackson explained.

Once Jackson passed the second round of applications, she was asked for an onsite interview at the Smithsonian.  For the face-to-face interview, Jackson spoke about the Anne Lowe exhibit.

“I talked about her as a designer and about her in terms of how she paralleled another African American designer of the 1800s Elizabeth Keckly,” said Jackson. “That wasn’t part of the display so I think that got me over because I was adding new dimension to the display.

When the museum opened on Sept. 24, Jackson guided visitors through the Smithsonian, acting as mouthpiece for a wide range of exhibits.

Currently, the museum is in possession of just over 37,000 artifacts of African American history. These objects include a fedora worn by Michael Jackson, The banner for the Oklahoma Federation of Colored Women’s Club, and a shawl given to Harriet Tubman by Queen Victoria.

Suicide on campus: What is the cost?

Kristin Hohman

Editor-in-Chief

Last in a 3-part seriesribbon

The effects of his suicide attempt are something that Lorain County Community College student Andrew Krause still grapples with on a consistent basis.

“It’s an everyday thing,” Krause explained. “It’s no longer month by month, week by week, day by day. You have to work at it hour by hour,” he continued. “So, even on your best day, it’s in the back of your mind.”

While many may see suicide as a micro issue, it is actually a macro issue, with far reaching repercussions.

Roughly one million suicides occur worldwide each year, according to Psychology Today. It has severe and lasting effects on those left behind. Also known as suicide survivors, the family and friends of a person who committed suicide often experience a complicated grieving process, according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP). Such complex emotions can include shock, extreme guilt, shame, anger or resentment, and feelings of failure, especially if the survivor witnessed the suicide firsthand. The AFSP also states that suicide survivors may develop trauma symptoms, regardless of whether they witnessed the suicide or not.

Family can play an important role when a loved one is experiencing suicide ideation, which can be described as thoughts or an unusual preoccupation with death or with dying. For Krause, he cited his mother as the only reason he did not ultimately take his own life.

“I didn’t want to put my mom through it. She obviously lost her father, she had to bury her parent in a very bad manner,” Krause said, as he explained how his mother’s father shot himself in 1986. “I didn’t want to put her through the burden of having to bury me on top of it. Really, that was the only thing keeping me here. I didn’t want to put her through that again,” Krause said.

While suicide takes a tremendous toll on families and friends, the economic toll can be just as costly.

The monetary cost of one suicide, per the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) averages about $1,795,379. For reported cases of

Genesis Rivera | The Collegian The cost of suicide per the most recent available data from the Centers for Disease Control.

Genesis Rivera | The Collegian
The cost of suicide per the most recent available data from the Centers for Disease Control.

suicide in 2013, the cost was estimated at $58.4 billion in the United States, per the SPRC. When adjusted to include unreported cases of suicide, that number jumps to $93.4 billion.

Roughly 97 percent of this cost was due to lost productivity and work efficiency, the SPRC found.The remaining three percent was found to be due to the associated cost of medical treatments. Moreover, the SPRC reported that for every $1 spent on psychotherapy and other related intervention techniques, an estimated $2.50 is saved in the cost of suicides.

Despite the overwhelming statistics, suicide is preventable and suicide ideation is treatable.

Treatment options for suicide ideation or attempts is specific to each individual case, according to the Mayo Clinic. Many cases of suicide are related to prior mental health or related illnesses. Most of the time, those illnesses need to be addressed in order to curb the thoughts of suicide. Treatment options include talk therapy, group sessions, and medication.

Despite the variety of treatment options, many people do not report feelings of suicide or other mental health issues. This is due, in large part, to the stigma associated with suicide.

“I definitely kept it to myself,” Krause said of his own experiences. “There’s the stigma that’s definitely one of the factors that prevents people from wanting to get help.”

Krause explained the difficulty in talking about such issues to a person who has no frame of reference. He said he felt brushed off in such circumstances.

“You always wrestle with the difficulties of somebody with depression talking to somebody who has no experience with it,” he said. “It’s always a situation of, ‘Well, I understand how you feel. It will get better,’” Krause continued. “It was more not having people to relate to. So, it just kind of felt like this was a one-man battle, and I kept it internalized.”

Such conversations can keep a person from seeking the very help and treatment they need.

Help, that Krause said is vital to overcoming suicide and the ideation that goes with it.

“Don’t run from it,” Krause said. “It doesn’t matter how you try to escape from it, or how fast or hard you run, it’s going to keep following you,” he said. “The best thing to do is stare it right in the eye and confront it. Sometimes you’re not big enough to beat it on your own,” Krause continued. “You need someone else’s help, and that’s nothing to be ashamed of. You’re not an outcast or an oddity,” he said. “It’s not something that ends in a day, or a week, or a month. It’s gonna be a long process, but you’re going to feel a lot better at the end of the road.”

Suicide Resources

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline:

1-800-273-8255

24 hours/day

7 days/week

All calls are confidential

LCCC Counseling Services:

LC 131

440-366*-4033

Women’s Link:

BU 113

440-366-4035

Microbiology students combat HIV

Tim Krezman

Staff Writer

Microbiology students at Lorain County Community College have come one step closer to being able to combat HIV. Microbiology professor Dr. Harry Kestler has been working with students at LCCC for about 10 years studying a specific gene.

“There was a group of students that approached me and said, ‘You know that gene you’re always talking about? We want to study it,’” Kestler said. “My goal here is to help the students learn,” he continued, “Their goal is to one day cure AIDS.”

HIV, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus, is spread through bodily fluids. The virus attacks the body’s immune system, specifically the CD4 cells, also known as T cells, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Over time, HIV can destroy many of these cells, leaving the body unable to defend itself from infections and disease. If left untreated, HIV can lead to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). AIDS is the third and final stage of HIV. However, not all who have HIV advance to this stage, according to the CDC.

No cure currently exists for HIV, but it can be controlled. Yet, LCCC students are hoping to change that.

One group of students performing the research made major progress when they were able to clone the CCR5 deletion gene. This gene has a mutation that is resistant to the Black Plague and they believe it is also resistant to HIV.

This group of students presented their findings at the 10th annual Cleveland State Interdisciplinary Research Conference on Nov. 5 at the Cleveland State University campus.

“It is always an honor representing LCCC at other colleges or universities.,” said biology major Darla Balawender. “Sometimes other institutions have stereotypes or biases against community colleges and it is an honor to show that we are doing very relevant and viable research,” she added.

“There are people with a Ph.D. who are doing this work, and here we are at community college,” said Gary Dodson, an Ashland University Partnership student who is involved with the HIV research and is studying to become a middle school science teacher. “Some of the students are 14 or 18 years old, and we are doing research that could change the world.”

Kestler added that about 80 percent of the presenters were Early College High School students.

“We’re taking things one day at a time since each result we get determines our next step,” Dodson continued.

The group would like to take their research as far as they can and get as close as they can to find a treatment method for those with HIV.

“It could happen soon,” Dodson explained, “but then again we may find out we need to start over with a completely different approach.”

Kristin Hohman contributed to this story

Coping with clinical depression

Randolph Digges

JRMN 151 Students

Last in a 2-part series

Depression leaves many people feeling as if they cannot function and live productive lives. However, there are numerous ways to combat depression, including psychotherapy and antidepressant medication.

There are a several resources available on Lorain County Community College’s campus that offer these services.  Women’s Link offers a variety of services to LCCC students and is located in BU 113. Such services include counseling, crisis intervention, legal services, housing services, and short term emergency loans up to $400 for students receiving financial aid. While the name may suggest it is for women only, all students or prospective students can utilize these services. Consultations are completely confidential, and the staff will do everything in their power to help.

Psychotherapy is the treatment of mental illnesses using psychology instead of traditional medicine. To combat depression, it usually takes both approaches.

Off campus, there are several psychologists in the Lorain County area, including PsychBC, on Center Rd. in Avon, and Psych and Psych Services on South Abbe Rd. in Elyria. While patients are charged for the use of their services, they are able to offer more personalized intensive care compared to on-campus resources.

Antidepressants are the most common form of treatment for depression. Each drug works by correcting a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most common type of antidepressant, according to healthline.com. These drugs work by decreasing serotonin reuptake, a chemical in the brain whose low levels are linked to depression. This allows more serotonin to work in your brain, according to healthline.com. Common SSRIs include Zoloft, Prozac, Celexa, and Lexapro.

The other type of antidepressants are serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). These drugs help improve serotonin and norepinephrine levels in the brain. Norepinephrine is another brain chemical linked to depression. Commonly prescribed SNRIs include Pristiq, Cymbalta, and Effexor.

Depression can be debilitating, but it doesn’t have to be. With the myriad treatment options available, finding the best method shouldn’t be difficult. Depression is an illness much less recognizable than the flu or common cold, but just as treatable with the proper help.

Kristin Hohman contributed to this story

From Golden State to Buckeye State: One student’s transition from West Coast to Midwest

Jeff Sheldon

JRNM 151 Student

 

“When my dad’s old job started to try and force him out, we realized this was an opportunity to get out of California,” said Lorain County

Renee McAdow

Renee McAdow

Community College student, Renee McAdow. She and her family felt strongly about change of life in Ohio.

“I had visited Ohio the year before on a road trip with my grandparents and fell in love with the state,” said McAdow, who is a journalism major. “It just worked out for me and my parents and we moved out here this past June.”

Just after a few days after her graduation from high school, she and her family were already in route to their new life in Ohio.

While looking to attend LCCC, she was happily surprised. “After jumping through a few hoops I was enrolled in classes, and LCCC was right behind our house,” said McAdow. “The price to stay in college in California would have been astronomical.”

After enrolling in a journalism class, one of her first reporting assignments was to cover the Stocker Arts Center, where she rekindled her love of the theater.

“This directed me to Jeremey Benjamin, who is the director of the theater,” McAdow explained. “I told him of my love the theater and that I enjoyed stage managing and he offered me a stage managing position of the fall show.”

So far, McAdow has said the biggest difference between California and Ohio has been the change of the seasons. But that’s also something she’s excited to experience.

“I’m really looking forward to the snow, I find the change of seasons to be inspiring as a writer,” said McAdow “ People at LCCC have been nice and I’m looking forward to the beauty of the snow, the rest of the school year, and beyond.”

Business club gets start at LCCC

Kent Springborn Jr.

Staff Writer

Lorain County Community College’s Student Business Club began new this semester. It was started by David Fairbairn, an accounting major. Unable to find a campus club that catered towards his major, Fairbairn decided to start his own. The purpose of the club is “to assist traditional and non-traditional LCCC and University Partnership students in reaching their current and future academic and professional goals” per the club’s purpose statement.

Fairbairn realized that there was a need for a club that revolved around all the main business majors at LCCC and decided to fill that need with the Student Business Club. After his decision to start the club, Fairbairn asked Lucy Malakar, Assistant Professor of Economics at LCCC, to be the faculty advisor of the club. “I think she [Malakar] is really honest and has the heart to help the club succeed,” said Fairbairn.

Some of the duties of an advisor is to help members make the club interesting for the student demographic and to help them understand the business and economic worlds, according to Malakar. “[We] are learning about the process as we go,” Malakar said.

Fairbairn said that one of the challenges of starting a new club is figuring out how to market the club to students who are unaware of its existence. “Word of mouth doesn’t always do it,” he explained. One way he plans to combat this is to keep the meetings fun and interesting. “If people keep being interested, they’ll probably keep coming back and invite others to join as well,” Fairbairn said.

Fairbairn also hopes to help people who join the Student Business Club. “I find fulfillment when I can help people,” he said.

Interested students can contact the club via sbclccc@gmail.com.

Final exam spotlight

Genesis Rivera | The Collegian

Genesis Rivera | The Collegian

LCCC’s International Initiatives Office to make its move

Michael Cuevas

JRNM 151 Student

Lorain County Community College has set a plan in motion to move the International Initiatives and Student Services office into the tutoring center, located in room 204 of the College Center building.

The International Initiatives office, which is currently located in the Patsie Campana building, should be moved in by March of 2017, according to Laura Carissimi, LCCC’s director of purchasing and facilities planning.

“I do believe it’s going to be a much more vibrant location,” Carissimi said of the move. She added that it will be a great opportunity for international students to interact with what LCCC has to offer, since the new location will be “near the heart of all other student clubs.”

The location of the tutoring center will not be changing despite the international office’s move. Carissimi noted that the move won’t be easy, but the opportunity to have LCCC’s international students more involved was too enticing to pass up.

Although students haven’t given any feedback, Carissimi is hopeful that students won’t have too much trouble adjusting to the new location. She said that the Patsie Campana building is quiet, but the move for students should be a positive one.

Engineers will be preparing the lighting, air conditioning, and heating in order to prepare the space for students. Carissimi said the work should be done by March.

She added that the international students at LCCC have are comfortable around each other, and that the move will allow for more “spontaneous interaction” between them. Carissimi firmly believes this to be a positive move for all involved.

Many international students chose LCCC in order to improve their English and forward their career goals.LCCC currently enrolls 109 students from more than 31 countries for the 2015-2016 academic year.