A Student Publication of Lorain County Community College

LCCC grads look forward to the next step

Retiring LCCC president, Dr. Roy Church during his speech to the class of 2016.

    Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief “I’m not going to trip. I’m excited, and it’s over,” were the thoughts of Olivia Moe as she crossed the stage to receive her diploma. Moe, along with 1,759 other graduates, collected their degrees and…

Collegian receives seven Press Club awards

Delaney-Gesing

Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief Lorain County Community College’s student-run newspaper, The Collegian, received seven accolades in the 2016 Excellence in Journalism Awards. The awards will be presented by the Press Club of Cleveland at a banquet on June 3 at the…

Naming of the new president in photos

Dr. Roy Church applaudes immediately following the Board’s decion to elect Dr. Marcia Ballinger as his successor. Church acted as a mentor to Ballinger throughout her career.

Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief A photographic look into the naming of LCCC’s new president, Dr. Marcia Ballinger. The announcement was made at the Board of Trustees meeting on April 21. Dr. Ballinger currently serves as LCCC’s provost and vice president for…

LCCC faculty member pens book on death row inmates

Rebecca Marion | The Collegian
Dr. Kimberlin examines the artwork he’s received from inmates.

Rebecca Marion Advertising Manager Dr. Bill Kimberlin, clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at Lorain County Community College, provides insight into his first hand accounts with death row inmates in his book “Watch Me Die”. From an early age Kimberlin…

Scholarship created in honor of Dr. Roy Church

Alexandra Sauer | The Collegian
Lorain County Community College President Dr. Roy Church at The Legacy of Leadership gala on April 25.

Rebecca Marion Advertising Manager The Lorain County Community College presented the Legacy of Leadership Gala on April 25 to celebrate the retirement and many accomplishments of its president Dr. Roy Church. Not only does the event seek to acknowledge the…

Ballinger named 6th president of LCCC

Dr. Marcia Ballinger
2016

Kristin Hohman Editor-in-Chief “Community is the middle name of this college, and I think one of the hallmarks of this institution is being responsive to the unique needs of the community. I look forward to doing that,” said Dr. Marcia Ballinger,…

Presidential candidates meet students, faculty, community members

rmd

During the week of April 4, Lorain County Community College was host to the three finalists in the search to succeed Dr. Roy Church as the college’s president. Dr. MaryAnn Janosik, Ray Michael Di Pasquale, and LCCC’s current provost and…

LCCC grads look forward to the next step

 

Retiring LCCC president, Dr. Roy Church during his speech to the class of 2016.

Retiring LCCC president, Dr. Roy Church during his speech to the class of 2016.

 

Kristin Hohman

Editor-in-Chief

“I’m not going to trip. I’m excited, and it’s over,” were the thoughts of Olivia Moe as she crossed the stage to receive her diploma. Moe, along with 1,759 other graduates, collected their degrees and certificates during Lorain County Community College’s 52nd annual commencement ceremony on May 14, 2016.

The ceremony began with a welcome from retiring LCCC president, Dr. Roy Church, who had a unique invitation for the graduating students before him.

“Before we get too far in today’s celebration,” Church said, “I know there is something we all want to do. I know most of us have a phone with us and we’re all excited to mark this day with the indisputable proof that we were all here – the selfie,” he said, as he encouraged students to pull out their cell phones and snap a quick picture to share on social media.

“Earlier this morning, I snapped a selfie with the district board of trustees and the other platform guests. I mean, this is my last chance – I had to capture this moment,” Church stated as his selfie appeared on the projection screens on either side of the stage.

The theme of this year’s ceremony was ‘leadership’, a theme that weaved its way through Church’s opening remarks.

“All of the graduates here today have shown dedication and persistence by getting to this point and earning a degree. In your hard work, you’ve given others someone to look up to and proven to yourself that you can set a goal and achieve it,” Church remarked. “Whether you realize it or not, you are all leaders here today, lighting a path to a brighter future.”

“I think it’ll be different. Being older and wiser – it’ll be better,” said graduate Ta’nija Drummer, when she thinks of the possibility of attending Cleveland State University this fall. Drummer, who earned both her associate’s of arts and associate’s of science, said that LCCC played a big role in preparing her for her future, mainly through the Early College High School program.

Dr. Marcia Ballinger, LCCC’s current provost and vice president for academic and learner services and incumbent president, was the event’s keynote speaker.

“16 years ago today, I sat where you are sitting today,” said Ballinger, who received her master’s degree in business administration from the University Partnership program.

“Somehow I managed to multitask and prioritize – just like all of you here today. You have overcome countless barriers to reach this milestone moment in your life and I, for one, could not be more proud,” she told the graduates.

Ballinger concluded with words of encouragement for the class of 2016. “Whatever your dream is, it is not too late to achieve it,” she said. “Never tell yourself you’re too old to make it. Never tell yourself you missed your chance. Never tell yourself that you aren’t good enough. There is still time left. You can do it, whatever

LCCC grads (left to right): Barbara Haase, Kelly Long, Mindea Wharton, and Terri LaGurdia pose for photos during a reception held after the ceremony.

LCCC grads (left to right): Barbara Haase, Kelly Long, Mindea Wharton, and Terri LaGurdia pose for photos during a reception held after the ceremony.

it is,” Ballinger commented.

Included in this year’s class were 1,460 LCCC graduates, 300 University Partnership graduates, and 64 Early College High School graduates.

“I’ve grown so much,” said Moe, who will be attending Cleveland State University this fall to study film and television production. “I’m looking forward to the next step.”

 

Collegian receives seven Press Club awards

Kristin Hohman

Editor-in-Chief

Delaney-Gesing

Delaney-Gesing

Lorain County Community College’s student-run newspaper, The Collegian, received seven accolades in the 2016 Excellence in Journalism Awards. The awards will be presented by the Press

Reynolds

Reynolds

Club of Cleveland at a banquet on June 3 at the House of Blues in Cleveland.

Winning staff members include Alex Delaney-Gesing, Cody Grossman, Kristin Hohman, Olivia Moe, Keith A. Reynolds, and Charlotte Weiss.

Delaney-Gesing won the award for Best Print Feature Story for a trade/2-year school for her story “A victim of violence”. The story chronicled the abuse that LCCC student Jennifer Varney suffered at the hands of her boyfriend and the issue of domestic violence across the country.

“Cross country takes 9th at nationals”, written by Grossman and Moe, won Best Print Sports Story for a trade/2-year school. The article details the NJCAA DIII National Championship match, in which

Moe

Moe

LCCC’s cross country team placed ninth out of 20 teams.

Reynolds, Hohman, Moe, and Weiss all won the honor for Best Online Report for a trade/2-year school for their work on “LCCC president retires”. The article announced Dr. Roy Church’s retirement from LCCC after nearly 30 years at the institution. “Dr. Church retires”, also written by Reynolds, Hohman, Moe, and Weiss, received the award for Best Print Newspaper Story for a trade 2-year

Weiss

Weiss

school.

“Students struggle with obesity”, written by Weiss, received two honors, one for Best Online Report, and the second for Best Print Feature Story. The story follows LCCC graduate and adjunct faculty, Norene Bohannon, as she struggles with obesity and shared her weight-loss success.

Hohman

Hohman

The entire Collegian staff also won for Best Print Feature story for “Thanksgiving memories”, where each member of the staff wrote about his or her favorite holiday memory.

Each spring, the Press Club of Cleveland acknowledges the best in print, online, and broadcast journalism. Journalists across the country judge the hundreds of entries that are submitted. The awards ceremony will be held on June 3 at the Cleveland House of Blues.

Life lessons from the rugby field: Why LCCC should have a team

Devon McFeaters

JRNM 151

Photo courtesy of the Avon Lake Rugby Club The Avon Lake Rugby Club vs. Rocky River. In rugby, the purpose of a scrummage, or scrum, is to fairly restart play after a stop in a match.

Photo courtesy of the Avon Lake Rugby Club
The Avon Lake Rugby Club vs. Rocky River. In rugby, the purpose of a scrummage, or scrum, is to fairly restart play after a stop in a match.

Sports have a history of teaching people life lessons. Sometimes the lessons you learn from sports will be carried with you for the rest of your life. I play for Avon Lake’s Rugby Club, where we are just coming off of a state championship season. This season we have kicked it off right, currently standing undefeated at 6-0. Rugby has taught me so much, from teamwork and determination, to always carrying myself with pride and dignity. After a match, leaving emotions on the field is vital. Just like in real life, if you get discouraged you cannot let that interrupt the path to success. Sports teach us new lessons all the time; they teach how to be a successful individual.

An old-school English game, rugby was developed in the 19th century by English public schools. A game that can be explained as a mix between football and soccer, it begins with two 15-man teams. Somewhat different from football, rugby has 11 men on each side and no pads. It’s a fast paced sport which is always moving forward.

Rules of the game

Rugby is played on a soccer field, which is bigger than a football field. The ball is oval shaped and must be passed backwards or laterally, keeping things moving forward at all times. Kicking the ball is also an option. A score is called a ‘try’ and you must ‘touch’  the ball down in the end zone. This is actually where the term ‘touchdown came from in football. A try is worth five points and a conversion by kicking the ball through the uprights after a try is worth two.

It is fast paced and the sport is picking up steam, becoming increasingly popular in the United States. The sport is growing quickly in high school, too. Ohio is host to 7 divisions of rugby throughout the state. It has a boy’s division one, two and three, then it also has a B-League and D-League. Girl’s rugby consists of division one and two. The sport is growing rapidly as it becomes more and more exposed.

No team in sight

Lorain County Community College does not currently have a rugby club and I believe that having one would bring many benefits to campus. The college’s lack of a rugby club was brought to the attention of LCCC’s Athletic Director Katie Marquard. “We do not currently have a rugby team because of a lack of interest,” Marquard said. “It is also very hard to put together a team like that, it takes a lot of time. If interest picked up, it would be interesting to see what could happen,” she said.

The difference between rugby and other varsity sports is simple, most rugby teams are considered club teams. Marquard explained the difference between a club sport and a varsity sport. “Varsity sports have certain requirements that have to be met in order for people to participate,” she said. “You must carry a certain grade point average and be taking at least 12 credit hours for the semester. Being a varsity sport is directly related to being a school team, funding can be taken from the athletic department. A club team has fewer regulation as we only require six credit hours,” Marquard explained. Having a rugby team could bring an added dimension to LCCC’s athletics.

Lessons in life

Rugby has taught many people life lessons. Former LCCC student, 21-year-old Brennon O’Connell, never got a chance to play rugby until he made it to Kent State University. “Rugby has taught me so much about myself and what limits I can reach,” Brennon said. “I wish when I was at LCCC for the two years, that we had a team. It is very valuable to combat stress and helps keep me focused on school.” The benefits of rugby can be different for everyone, O’Connell said. “I have learned so much about camaraderie too, the people I have met through this game will be my friends for life.”

‘Leaving it all on the field’ is one of the most important things about rugby. After matches, teams have what is known as a social. The home team prepares food for the visiting team and they speak about the game. It is a totally different atmosphere than most are used to from other sports. Avon Lake’s Head Rugby Coach Steve Maynard said that rugby has allowed for many opportunities in his life. “Rugby has enabled me to travel around and see different places with a group of friends that I will have for the rest of my life,” Maynard said. “It has taught me too many lessons to even keep count, and it has become a part of my everyday life. It helps you become a better man,” he said.

The sport itself is very physical due to the fact that pads are not worn. Interestingly enough, injuries happen far less than almost any other contact sport. All that is worn in rugby is a mouthpiece, but players are not looking to blow out knees or hit head to head. This allows players to experience the game for much longer when compared to a football career. Some people even play rugby for 20 years, like Maynard.

Jeremiah Edwards, 18, is new to the game but fell in love with it instantly. “I have always been competitive,” Edwards said. “I have done track, football and basketball, I was open to trying out rugby, even though I was a bit nervous about getting hit with no pads on. The result was awesome, I fell in love with the game so quickly. It has taught me so much about myself and about life,” Edwards said.

Rugby may not be the most popular sport in the world, but it teaches life lessons like no other. Being knocked down can be hard to get up from, but rugby teaches players how to do that, literally and figuratively. Adding a rugby club of some sort would be extremely valuable to LCCC and its student body because of the things a person can learn from a simple game.

Commodore baseball looks forward to postseason play

Tyler Mantin

JRNM 151

With just eight regular season games left, the Lorain County Community College Commodores look to finish strong heading into the postseason. With a record of 9-13, head coach Bill Frawley says the season is going exactly how he expected. “We’re beating the teams we’re supposed to, and losing to a few of the tougher teams we’ve faced,” Frawley said. “Our offense has improved a lot since last season, but we’re still not where we want to be. Our pitching has been really strong so far though.”
One reason for the strong pitching has been the addition of a few players who weren’t on the roster last year. Star pitcher Shane Derricotte credits newcomers outfielder and pitcher Zack Minney, and pitcher Mark Flachbart, for stepping up this year. “They’ve both been huge contributors for us this season, especially pitching.” Derricotte said. Minney threw a complete game in a 5-1 victory over Mercyhurst PA, a division 2 powerhouse, giving up no earned runs. With a huge victory like that, the Commodores feel good heading into tournament play. “We can definitely take this thing far as long as we play the way we’re capable of playing all the time,” Derricotte said. “That’s the key, we can’t play down to our competition, we have to be consistent.” Frawley also feels confident as the season winds down. “We’re a very close team. The guys all play for each other, and when you have a team like that, anything can happen.” The Commodores postseason begins May 16.

Commodores drop doubleheader

Cody Grossman

Staff Writer

14-3 was the ugly ending to a beautiful day for baseball as Lorain County Community College  took on the Saints of Mercyhurst on April 17.

Barrett Huspaska took the mound for LCCC and he started off hot, striking out the first batter. Then he let up and give up a couple hits, leading to a 2-0 Mercyhurst lead in the first inning. Mercyhurst’s Scott Pierce turned out to be Huspaska’s biggest threat, hitting a homerun off him. Huspaska was in trouble early. He managed to force a ground out and got out of the inning only giving up three runs.

The second inning for the Commodores was their ticket back into the ballgame. Back-to-back errors from the Saint’s infield loaded up the bases and gave LCCC a great chance to score with zero outs. A walk brought home a baserunner, giving the Commodores their first run of the game. After that, a sacrifice fly brought in another runner. The bases are loaded after another Mercyhurst walk,  eventually tying the game at three. LCCC would then groundout and leave it a tie game for the end of the inning.

Cody Grossman | The Collegian Pitcher Barrett Huspaska took the mound for the Commodores on April 17. LCCC lost to Mercyhurst with a final score of 14-3.

Cody Grossman | The Collegian
Pitcher Barrett Huspaska took the mound for the Commodores on April 17. LCCC lost to Mercyhurst with a final score of 14-3.

Mercyhurst would score again in the 4th inning to make it a 4-3 game. From there on out, it got ugly for LCCC. In the top of the 5th inning Jason Banas made a great diving catch to save a couple runs. Despite this great play, Mercyhurst put up 10 runs making the ballgame 14-3. In the bottom of the 5th the Commodores were given one last chance to put up a fight and save the game. They could not and Mercyhurst ended the game with the mercy-rule. The final score was 14-3.

LCCC struggled to get the bats going in game 2 as well, while Mercyhurst ran up the score. The final after seven innings was Mercyhurst 8, LCCC 0. The Commodores take on Butler Community College on the road on

May 1.

Grad creates non-profit obstacle mud run and festival

Olivia Moe

Managing Editor

“I have a dad that smokes cigarettes and I can see first hand what it does to your health,” said recent University Partnership graduate, Dylan Kadow. “My career revolves around not smoking and lung health.”

Kadow is founder of the Huff and Puff obstacle race and festival that takes place on May 21 at Klingshirn Winery in Avon Lake. This second annual race hopes to promote and encourage community residents to take their health into consideration. The hope is to also have the community begin to improve both their physical health as well as their level of education regarding their everyday choices concerning their health, including those that are related to smoking.

The race itself was inspired by a class assignment and his personal life. “I was class president of the BGSU Respiratory Care Program through the University Partnership at LCCC, and one of my duties was to make sure my classmates completed their required amount of community service,” Kadow explained. “I thought it would be cool to put on a fund raiser for something respiratory related, so I combined the idea of putting on a race and donating to the American Lung Association,” he continued. “A regular 5k race just didn’t see to do it for me, and being a mud/obstacle race runner myself, I thought ‘Let’s put on a mud run,’” Kadow said.

The Huff and Puff Fun Obstacle Run is a well rounded race for all types of participants. There are a variety of obstacles, each that require different skill levels to get through. If participants have trouble with an obstacle, no worries, said Kadow. “No one is required to do an obstacle,” he said. “If they do not feel comfortable completing one, they can simply go around.” Kadow explained.

For the higher skill level obstacles, if participants choose to go around, there will be sit-ups or push-ups to replace that obstacle.

The obstacles include a 12′ rope wall, 10′ tire wall, 9′ vertical wall, 24′ long monkey bars over a mud pit, a quagmire, river crossings, woods run, hill climbs, trench and net crawl, pallet climbs, slanted wall climbs, mud pits, water plunges, and mud slides.

Building  the race from the ground up was just as difficult as completing it. “I originally had no clue what I was undertaking,” Kadow said. “Making this a reality was the hardest and greatest accomplishment I had ever done to this point. It started with creating my own business and understanding all of the responsibilities that come with it,” he continued. “An enormous amount of paperwork, taxes, budgeting, and organization. Then there is planning of the actual event of course,” Kadow said.

Finding a location was almost as difficult, Kadow explained. “Being a high risk event, most companies are cautious when agreeing to something like this,” he said. “Some won’t even look in your direction or respond or [they] wait until the last minute to respond.”

Kadow considers himself lucky for knowing the owner of  Klingshirn Winery, who agreed to host the race.

“I have worked there the past three years,” Kadow said. “He allows me to run on his land and use his farm tools to help build the course. I did need to get permission by the city and three other companies for the race, because the race will run on their land as well,” he said.

Despite the difficulties, Kadow has had an immense amount of help from the community, friends, and family to construct, fund, and promote the race.

The festival portion will be taking place at the end of the race, giving local vendors and outreach programs the opportunity to promote a healthy lifestyle.

A DJ, food trucks, fitness challenges for prizes, inflatables, raffle baskets, beer and wine will all be a part of the festival. Spectators are encouraged to attend, as admission is free. Parking, transportation, baggage holds, and showers are free, as well.

Participants and spectators should expect a personal experience when attending the event. “The event is designed for the people,” Kadow said. “I had created this event from what I liked from the other events I have attended.”

Kadow, who is working towards his Bachelor’s degree, will then apply to Physician Assistant School at Oregon Health & Science University for his Masters degree. He hopes that the race will grow in the future, as a state and national event. “We hope to make an impact on the community and reach people of all backgrounds. We hope to encourage a healthy lifestyle and encourage people to overcome obstacles of all types,” Kadow said.

Matt Aussem, a finance major at Lorain County Community College and member of the Student Senate, also plays a role as a chair member of the Huff and Puff event, whose main responsibilities include handling the financial aspects of the business.

“He has more of a medical background, I have more of a business and marketing background. I make sure that the organizational stuff is done properly,” Aussem explained.

Aussem will run the race and hopes to do a fair amount of networking with other local start-up businesses once the race is complete. “We really want to get the community involved. I highly encourage everyone to show up and enjoy themselves either during the race or at the festival,” Aussem said. “Besides the money going to the American Lung Association to help eliminate public smoking and the promotion of the local start-up businesses we just want everyone to have fun,” he added.

All proceeds raised will go to fund medical research that will eventually cure various diseases. It is the only 100% nonprofit obstacle racing company in the United States.  “It all starts with a life changing experience and we hope Huff and Puff is that experience,” added Kadow.

Kadow is  working with the United States Obstacle Course Racing (USOCR), a company designed to promote, logistically plan, and further business for obstacle course races. “I plan for my race to increase to a couple events annually, then eventually multi-state,” Kadow said. “We are already planning a second race for each year. This will be a zombie obstacle adventure run in the fall time. This run goes to a great cause and we want everyone to be here to make a difference,” he explained.

For more information or to register or volunteer, go to huffandpuffracing.org. or visit them on Facebook at: “Huff and Puff Fun Obstacle Run”. More information can also be found by emailing dylan@huffandpuffracing.org or by calling 440-787-6146.

Student spotlight: Zambian roots, American identity

Deborah Espejo

JRNM 151

Walking through the corridors of Lorain County Community College, Mayaya Phir can’t be missed. Colorful outfits, big earrings and beautiful African-made braids are what define the style of the 23-year-old Zambian

Deborah Espejo | The Collegian LCCC international student, Mayaya Phiri, hails from Zambia.

Deborah Espejo | The Collegian
LCCC international student, Mayaya Phiri, hails from Zambia.

student.

Phiri was born in Zambia, a country in the southern part of Africa. Four years ago, this young woman challenged herself and came to the United States. Thanks to a study abroad agency, she requested a university in Kentucky and was accepted. She then decided to move to Ohio after she found that LCCC offered good programs for a low fee. Phir is enrolled in LCCC, enjoying a clinical science therapy program.

“It [LCCC] is smaller than my old school in Kentucky, so I made better connections here,” Phiri said. She said that the U.S. education system is different from Zambia. “They use a British system back home where everything is set and where the students can easily talk to their advisers,” Phiri said.

However, she has adapted well to American culture because she describes herself as open-minded. It prepared her for a different lifestyle, like fast food, for instance. “I would say ‘Oh this is so cheap’ rather than ask people ‘Do you really eat that?’” Actually, she said that fast food is expensive in Zambia.

Phiri said she misses some aspects of Zambia, like people in general. “People back home are very friendly wherever you go and always try to help you,” Phiri said. She feels Americans are more by themselves and put the individual first. It was a difficult transition for her, as she is the type of person who prefers to put people first.

She also noticed that people in Zambia have more fun while Americans are reserved, until you get to know them. “In my country, what you see first in a person is usually how she really is,” Phiri said. “A person will not pretend to be anyone else. If she wants to be friendly with you, she will be.”

Despite the cultural and lifestyle differences, Phiri is not homesick, but still continues to include some of her cultural traditions in her everyday life. For example, she will use her native language to talk to her parents or uncle on the phone.

Because Zambian is not spoken in America, Phiri does not feel the need to speak another language except for English.

Phiri is balanced between two countries: One is Zambia, where she is originally from, and where she had developed a certain culture. The other is the U.S., where she gets most of her experiences in life. “Once you are on a place for so long, you get used to it and this is where I did my growing process,” Phiri said. “I was 18 when I came but I matured. My vision of things has changed. I feel my identity is more here, even if I have my own culture.”

There are almost two years left for the student before she returns in Zambia. Phiri expects to have her degree, so she will be able to come back to America or work all around the world.

Naming of the new president in photos

Kristin Hohman
Editor-in-Chief

A photographic look into the naming of LCCC’s new president, Dr. Marcia Ballinger. The announcement was made at the Board of Trustees meeting on April 21. Dr. Ballinger currently serves as LCCC’s provost and vice president for academic and learner services, and will succeed Dr. Roy Church on July 1.

Dr. Roy Church applaudes immediately following the Board’s decion to elect Dr. Marcia Ballinger as his successor. Church acted as a mentor to Ballinger throughout her career.

Dr. Roy Church applaudes immediately following the Board’s decion to elect Dr. Marcia Ballinger as his successor. Church acted as a mentor to Ballinger throughout her career.

Dr. Ballinger speaks in the Culinary Arts Center after hearing news of her selection.

Dr. Ballinger speaks in the Culinary Arts Center after hearing news of her selection.

 

Photo: Ron Jantz Current LCCC President Dr. Roy Church and newly selected President Dr. Marcia Ballinger walk in to a reception held after the Board of Trustees chose Ballinger as LCCC’s next president.

Photo: Ron Jantz
Current LCCC President Dr. Roy Church and newly selected President Dr. Marcia Ballinger walk in to a reception held after the Board of Trustees chose Ballinger as LCCC’s next president.

 

Search process

by the numbers:

Search committee members — 9 Search firms reviewed — 8 Search firms interviewed — 3  

Candidates applied — 35 Male candidates — 25 Female candidates — 10 

States represented — 20 Candidates with doctoral degrees — 31 Candidates with masters degrees — 3

Candidates with other degrees — 1 College presidents that applied — 12 Provosts that applied — 17 Candidates serving as faculty — 4

Suitable candidates — 10 Semi-finalists — 8 Finalists — 3

 

Dr. Roy Church greets LCCC faculty and community members who gathered waiting the announcement.

Dr. Roy Church greets LCCC faculty and community members who gathered waiting the announcement.

Members of LCCC’s Board of Trustees gather during their meeting to decide on personnel matters. The Board voted 9-0 to name Dr. Marcia Ballinger as the college’s next president.

Members of LCCC’s Board of Trustees gather during their meeting to decide on personnel matters. The Board voted 9-0 to name Dr. Marcia Ballinger as the college’s next president.

Charlotte Weiss | The Collegian Dr. Church and Dr. Ballinger shake hands following the announcement.

Charlotte Weiss | The Collegian
Dr. Church and Dr. Ballinger shake hands following the announcement.

 

“Now, I write the truth”‘

Chuck Weiss, Online Editor

Chuck Weiss, Online Editor

Charlotte Weiss

Online Editor

“What do you write?”

That was one of the first questions the Collegian Editor-in-Chief asked me during my interview on August 27, 2015. It was a Thursday afternoon. It was a beautifully sunny day and the hustle and bustle of Welcome Week was still in full swing. There I was amid the festivities, a petite ball of nothing but anxiety waiting to interview for a position she so desperately wanted. I had sat the bench outside CC207 for over an hour with sweaty palms and nerves that ranked at least an 8 on the Richter Scale. I had finally worked up the nerve to go in and meet with who is now one of the most important people in my life, and attempted to put my thoughts into words for him. I tried to craft my answers intelligently, but to that question I could only respond with the generic, one-word, “Everything.”

 

At that time, I thought I was answering truthfully. I genuinely thought that the short fiction and rambling poetry I would spew haphazardly onto a page could be considered “everything” there was to write about, but I learned very quickly during my time reporting at the Collegian that I hadn’t been writing everything. Not even close.

 

My experience at LCCC and the Collegian is one that I will be forever thankful for. I made my best friends while doing what I loved to do. I was trained in the art of journalism by someone I look up to so much. I met so many important figures and got to know so many of the wonderful folks on campus. When I first started at LCCC, I embarrassingly wouldn’t have been able to name any member of the faculty, but now I can happily say the opposite. I have shaken hands with the great Dr. Roy Church, chatted over pizza with the very sweet Dr. Marcia Ballinger, taken a class with one of the most influential people in my writing career Kimberly Greenfield, and interviewed the amazingly talented and inspiring poet Bruce Weigl. I wouldn’t have done any of that if I hadn’t decided to come to LCCC, or been brave enough to dry my palms and walk semi-confidently into CC207 to interview for a job as a reporter for the Collegian.

 

I went into that newspaper office with very little other than nerves and a Star Wars purse full of notebooks that held scribbled words on the pages, but I walk out now with so much more than I could have ever hoped. I am able to leave this place with confidence, knowledge, new skills, fond memories, fantastic friendships, and a new name that I somehow got roped into happily allowing only one person in this world to call me.

 

In the fall I will be starting at Cleveland State University (a place that unfortunately has no record of any Chuck Weiss) with a major of English, something I had never previously believed was in the cards for me. I am going on to a future of doing what I love to do: writing. I will be leaving the place that I have found such a wonderful home in as Online Editor of the Collegian. I will dearly miss the not-so-smiling faces of the Collegian staff on print day. I’ll miss having to carry around a recorder with me 24/7. I’ll miss the note taking in the numerous meetings and events I was lucky enough to attend (anyone who knows me probably knows that this is not the end of my secretarial career). I will miss the deadlines, having to write in AP Style, and millions of calls to set up interviews. But who am I kidding, really? I fancy myself a writer, but I don’t quite think that the journalism bug is quite finished with me yet.

 

So, if you were to ask me what I write now, I wouldn’t be so naïve as to say my previous go-to response. I would answer something much more journalistic by nature, as has been so wonderfully ingrained in me:

 

What do I write? I write the truth.

Farewell from long-time staffer

Olivia Moe, Managing Editor

Olivia Moe, Managing Editor

Olivia Moe

Managing Editor

 

So I had this idea to ask my editor if I could write one last article as a ‘goodbye’ to my time at the paper and college before I graduated and transferred to Cleveland State. When she said ‘yes’, there was a moment of excitement that I could do what a majority of journalists want to do; write what they want to write.

I use the term ‘moment’ because within that short amount of time, I realized ‘Wow, I have no idea what I am going to say’. How do you summarize a few volumes, several semesters, and a couple of years into one portion of what could take up a full issue of the paper?

I have been a part of The Collegian since the fall of 2013. I have been a contributor, sports writer (later Sports Editor), online editor, and now managing editor. Despite the titles beneath my name, I have covered many things around our campus. That is one of the best parts about being a journalist; you are rarely bored and you sometimes do not have to wait long for a story to show up. Like Forrest Gump’s mama said about life, journalism “was always like a box of chocolates, you never know what you are going to get”.

I have covered nationally recognized sports teams, professors, clubs, organizations, events, and even a film premiere while at LCCC. If that is not a box of assorted chocolates, I do not know what is. Anyone who is part of their school newspaper knows what a lucky feeling that is.

I thought about writing a detailed account of what it was like to work for five different editors and how each of them impacted my life, and in turn, my writing. From my desk, I saw them grow and develop into some of the best people I have worked for. There were the best and the worst of times for all of us, but like any weird family (or ‘normal’ one), we braved through it together and came out on top.

I thought about giving words of advice to those in JRNM 151 about what to expect. Then again, this is the world of journalism, there is very little you can expect. I guess I would just say then to expect that you are one of the greatest assets to us staff. You may think you are not making a difference just yet, but believe me; you are so valuable it’s not even funny.

Also, please turn your stories in on time. Indulge that wonderful and sick thrill of your editor when they have your name pop up in their inbox.

I might have shared some words of wisdom to the incoming students at LCCC when they find this issue over the summer or next fall. You might want to be somewhere else, I know I did and still kind of want to, even when I am weeks from leaving this campus. Please, do not shake off this place. It took me until now to realize that, although I have been here a while, it was where I needed to be. Just keep your heads up, you’ll do fine in given time.

Also, take Don Busi or Kim Greenfield for any English class, Jarrett Pervola for Humanities, Dave Cotton for theater (Diane Papp, Scott Knowles and Jeremy Benjamin for labs), if you need to take a science course with someone I recommend Dr. Ruby Beil, and Aaron Weiss and Lisa Sheppard for math. Seriously, they are rockstars.

I then thought about those who will be graduating with me in May. Even though we are finishing up and there will only be a short amount of days (or cares) left to think about school work and class, take a deep breath and keep marching. As of print day we will be 18 days or so away from ‘freedom’ for a little while and although I know I will be spending my day with a mimosa from the Bourbon Street Barrel Room in Tremont and catching a Cleveland Indians game, I will have to begin to start my next chapter soon. It will be exciting and nerve wrecking, but I think like many of you, it will be worth it and incredibly amazing.

I know I am going to miss certain places and people. I know I am going to miss the banter between the guys at the grill at the cafeteria as they construct my turkey burger. I am going to miss the noises that the bookshelves in the library make when I am looking for a book and how easily amused I am by them. But to quote Bilbo Baggins “I think I am quite ready for another adventure,” and that means finding new ways to amuse myself. I think it is something all of us should do for ourselves, keep searching for what little things amuse us.

In closing, I think I will leave you all with a huge thank you for allowing me to pester you with questions and for reading my articles. I am also grateful to your responses (including only one piece of hate mail regarding my first editorial “Does Size Really Matter?”). The joke’s on them. I thought their response, like the head of the article, was funny.. Other than seeing your name in print, those responses make the efforts and lives of journalists complete.

Thank you.